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Pomelo or shaddock includes cultivars with round to obovoid fruit much favored for festival decoration as well as eating. No truly wild plants (presumably with much smaller fruit) have been seen. Citrus maxima is a parent with C. reticulata of C. ×aurantium.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of China Vol. 11: 91, 93, 94, 95 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Description

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Trees. Young branches, abaxial surface of leaves, peduncles, and ovaries pilose. Branches usually purplish, flat with ridges when young. Petiole 2-4 × 0.5-3 cm or less, winged; leaf blade broadly ovate or elliptic, 9-16 × 4-8 cm or larger, thick, dark green, base rounded, apex rounded to obtuse and sometimes mucronate. Flowers solitary or in racemes; flower buds purplish or rarely milky white. Calyx 3-5-lobed. Petals 1.5-2 cm. Stamens 25-35, some undeveloped. Style long and thick. Fruit pale yellow and yellowish green, globose, oblate, pyriform, or broadly obconic, usually more than 10 cm in diam., with large prominent oil dots, to 200-seeded or seedless; pericarp spongy; sarcocarp with 10-15(-19) segments, white, pink, reddish, or rarely milky yellow. Seeds irregularly shaped, with conspicuous ridges, undeveloped seeds numerous; embryo solitary; cotyledons milky white. Fl. Apr-May, fr. Sep-Dec. 2n = 18, 36.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of China Vol. 11: 91, 93, 94, 95 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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Habitat & Distribution

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Cultivated and naturalized in S China [probably native to SE Asia].
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of China Vol. 11: 91, 93, 94, 95 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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Synonym

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Aurantium maximum Burman in Rumphius & Burman, Herb. Amboin. Auctuar. 7: Index [16]. 1755; A. decumanum (Linnaeus) Miller; Citrus ×aurantium Linnaeus subsp. decumana (Linnaeus) Tanaka; C. ×aurantium var. decumana Linnaeus; C. ×aurantium f. grandis (Linnaeus) Hiroe; C. ×aurantium var. grandis Linnaeus; C. costata Rafinesque; C. decumana (Linnaeus) Linnaeus; C. grandis (Linnaeus) Osbeck; C. grandis var. pyriformis (Hasskarl) Karaya; C. grandis var. sabon (Siebold ex Hayata) Hayata; ?C. kwangsiensis Hu; C. medica Linnaeus subf. pyriformis (Hasskarl) Hiroe; C. obovoidea Yu. Tanaka; C. pampelmos Risso; C. pompelmos Risso; C. pyriformis Hasskarl; C. sabon Siebold ex Hayata.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 91, 93, 94, 95 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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Brief Summary

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Citrus maxima, the pomelo (also called pummelo or shaddock) in the Rutaceae (citrus family). It is a medium-sized tree but the largest of all Citrus species, with large leaves, flowers, and fruits. The species is native to southern China and Malaysia (and possibly other parts of southeast Asia), and is now cultivated in many tropical and semi-tropical countries for its large fruits. This species was a progenitor of the grapefruit (C. X paradisi) and the tangelo (C. reticulata), among other modern citrus hybrids. Pomelos are often confused with grapefruits, from which they can generally be distinguished by their larger size, thicker rinds, milder—even sweet—flavor, and tough bitter membranes that are often considered inedible. The C. maxima tree, which is the most cold-intolerant citrus species, has a rounded crown and grows 5 to 15 m (15 to 50 ft) tall. The tree has large evergreen oblong to elliptic leaves, 10.5 to 20 cm (4 to 8 in) long, with winged petioles (leaf stems). The flowers and fruits are borne singly, in contrast to grapefruits (C. X paradisi), in which they grown in clusters of 2 to 20. The fruits, which vary from round to pear-shaped and ripen to yellow, orange, or red, are large--30 cm or more in diameter, and weighing up to 9 kg (20 lbs). The flesh of the fruit, which may be greenish yellow, yellow, pink, or red, is often juicy, and divided into 11 to 18 segments. The flavor is sweet to somewhat acidic. Like other citrus fruits, pomelos are high in vitamin C. They are generally eaten as a fresh fruit, and they store well. They have long been popular in Asia, especially China, Indonesia, and Thailand, but are increasingly found in specialty markets in the U.S. as well. The juice is also used in various beverages (both alcoholic and non), and the peel may be candied. Traditional medicinal uses of the fruit include treatment of coughs, fevers, and gastrointestinal disorders. The aromatic flowers are picked and processed into perfume in Vietnam, and the wood, which is heavy and hard-grained, used for making tool handles. (Bailey et al. 1976, Morton 1987, van Wyk 2005.)
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Pomelo Fruits

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what is a pomelo? pomelo health benefits are various such as it boosts your immunity system; Pomelo fruits lower the cramping and balances the blood pressure. It is good for heart health, helps in weight loss and also is anti-cancer.

Pomelo fruit is father of grapefruit. It is the largest member of the citrus family. There are several pomelo health benefits. The pomelo fruit has lot many health benefits such as it boosts your immunity system; it lowers the cramping and balances the blood pressure.

Reference

https://www.benefitsuses.com/

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Pomelo

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Cluster of flower buds
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Pomelo flowers
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Pomelo tree in southern Vietnam

The pomelo, pummelo, or in scientific terms Citrus maxima or Citrus grandis, is the largest citrus fruit from the family Rutaceae and the principal ancestor of the grapefruit.[1] It is a natural, i.e., non-hybrid, citrus fruit, native to Southeast Asia and Malaysia.[1] Similar in taste to a large grapefruit, the pomelo is commonly consumed and used for festive occasions throughout Southeast Asia.

Etymology

The etymology of the word "pomelo" derived from pompelmoes, which is rendered pompelmus in German, and pamplemousse in French.[1] Its botanical name, Citrus maximus, means "big citrus". In English, the word "pomelo" (also spelled pomello, pummelo, pommelo, pumelo) has become the more common name, although "pomelo" has historically been used for grapefruit. (The 1973 printing of the American Heritage Dictionary, for example, gives grapefruit as the only meaning of "pomelo.")

After a captain Shaddock of an East India Company ship introduced it to Barbados, the fruit was called "shaddock" in English.[2][3] From there the name spread to Jamaica in 1696.[4] It remains a common name for the fruit among English authors.[5] The fruit is also known as jabong in Hawaii and jambola in varieties of English spoken in South Asia.[1]

Description and uses

The pomelo tree may be 16–50 feet (4.9–15.2 m) tall, possibly with a crooked trunk 4–12 inches (10–30 cm) thick, and low-hanging, irregular branches.[1] Leaf petioles are distinctly winged, with alternate, ovate or elliptic shapes 2–8 inches (51–203 mm) long, with a leathery, dull green upper finish, and hairy lower leaf.[1] The flowers – single or in clusters – are fragrant and yellow-white in color.[1]

The pomelo is a large citrus fruit, 15–25 centimetres (6–10 in) in diameter,[6] usually weighing 1–2 kilograms (2–4 lb). It has a thicker rind than a grapefruit.[1] Containing 11–18 segments, the flesh tastes like a mild grapefruit (believed to be a hybrid of Citrus maxima and the orange).[1][7] The flesh has little of the common grapefruit bitterness. The enveloping membranous material around the segments is bitter, considered inedible, and usually discarded.[1] There are two varieties: a sweet kind with white flesh, and a sour kind with pinkish flesh, the latter more likely to be used as a ceremony, rather than eaten.[1] The fruit generally contains few, relatively large seeds, but some varieties have numerous seeds.[1]

The juice is regarded as delicious, and the rind is used to make preserves or may be candied.[1] In Brazil, the thick skin may be used for making a sweet conserve, while the spongy pith of the rind is discarded. In Sri Lanka, it is often eaten as a dessert, either raw or sprinkled with sugar. Some fatty Asian dishes use sliced pre-soaked pith to absorb the sauce and fat for eating. In large parts of Southeast Asia where pomelo is native, it is a common dessert, often eaten raw and sprinkled with, or dipped in, a salt mixture. It is eaten in salads.[1] In the Philippines, the juice is mixed with pineapple and made into a pink drink.[8]

The fruit may have been introduced to China around 100 BC.[1]

Propagation and genetic diversity

Citrus maxima is usually grafted onto other citrus rootstocks, but may be grown from seed.[1] Though the seeds of the pomelo are monoembryonic, producing seedlings identical to their parents, and therefore pomelo is typically grown from seed.[1] Seeds can be stored for 80 days at 41 °F (5 °C) and with moderate relative humidity.[1] High-quality varieties are propagated by air-layering or by budding onto favored rootstocks.[1]

A wide variability in the physical and chemical characteristics of pomelo occurs across southern Asia.[1]

Varieties

Non-hybrid pomelos

Possible non-hybrid pomelos

Hybrids

The pomelo is one of the original citrus species from which the rest of cultivated citrus have been hybridized, (others being citron, mandarin, and to a lesser extent, papedas and kumquat). In particular, the common orange and the grapefruit are presumed to be naturally occurring hybrids between the pomelo and the mandarin, with the pomelo providing the larger size and greater firmness.

The pomelo is employed today in artificial breeding programs:

Nutrition

Raw pomelo flesh is 89% water, 10% carbohydrates, 1% protein, and contains negligible fat (table). A 100 gram reference amount provides 38 calories, and is rich in vitamin C (73% of the Daily Value), with no other micronutrients in significant content (table).

Potential for drug interaction

As a species of citrus, pomelo may cause adverse effects, similar to those caused by grapefruit, through the inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of prescription drugs such as anti-hypertensives and anticoagulants.[10]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Julia F Morton (1987). "Pummelo: Citrus maxima; p. 147-151. In: Fruits of warm climates". NewCROP, New Crop Resource Online Program, Center for New Crops and Plant Products, Purdue University. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  2. ^ Pomelo (Pummelo) Citrus maxima
  3. ^ fruitInfo-trdLevel2021.html
  4. ^ American Heritage Dictionary, 1973.
  5. ^ "Shaddock". Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  6. ^ Pomelo: Growing the granddaddy of grapefruit, SFGate.com, December 25, 2004
  7. ^ Julia F Morton (1987). "Grapefruit: Citrus paradisi; p. 152–158. In: Fruits of warm climates". NewCROP, New Crop Resource Online Program, Center for New Crops and Plant Products, Purdue University. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  8. ^ Hargreaves, Dorothy; Hargreaves, Bob (1970). Tropical Trees of the Pacific. Kailua, Hawaii: Hargreaves. p. 51.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Morton, J. 1987. Tangelo. p. 158–160. In: Fruits of warm climates. Julia F. Morton, Miami, FL. http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tangelo.html
  10. ^ Bailey, D. G.; Dresser, G.; Arnold, J. M. O. (2012-11-26). "Grapefruit-medication interactions: Forbidden fruit or avoidable consequences?". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 185 (4): 309–316. doi:10.1503/cmaj.120951. ISSN 0820-3946. PMC 3589309. PMID 23184849.
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Pomelo: Brief Summary

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 src= Cluster of flower buds  src= Pomelo flowers  src= Pomelo tree in southern Vietnam

The pomelo, pummelo, or in scientific terms Citrus maxima or Citrus grandis, is the largest citrus fruit from the family Rutaceae and the principal ancestor of the grapefruit. It is a natural, i.e., non-hybrid, citrus fruit, native to Southeast Asia and Malaysia. Similar in taste to a large grapefruit, the pomelo is commonly consumed and used for festive occasions throughout Southeast Asia.

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Ponderosa lemon

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Citron varieties3 etrog.JPG Acidic-pulp varieties Non-acidic varieties Pulpless varieties Citron Hybrids Related articles

The ponderosa lemon (Citrus x pyriformis) is a citrus hybrid of a pomelo and a citron. It is not the same as the 'Yuma Ponderosa' lemon pomello hybrid, that is used as citrus rootstock.[1]

Description

Ponderosa lemon trees are slow growing but reach a height of 12 to 24 feet at maturity. The leaves are long, evergreen, glossy, and citron-like, being ovate elliptic in shape and lemon scented.[2] They have medium thick branches, that have many spines. New growth is purple tinged, as are the flowers.[3] Ponderosa lemon also has larger than average citrus flowers, and bears fruit throughout the year. When grown as an ornamental, it requires pruning to control the shape, and may be trained as a bush or tree.

Ponderosa lemon is less cold hardy than a true lemon.[4] It bears medium to large fruit that have a thick and bumpy rind. The fruits are seedy, and while they look similar to a citron, they taste like a lemon.

Origin

The ponderosa lemon originated in roughly 1887, and is believed to come from a chance seedling grown in Hagerstown, Maryland. It was later named and introduced to the nursery trade in 1900.[2] Though often referred to as a cross between the lemon and citron, a recent genomic analysis showed it to solely contain pomelo (Citrus maxima) and citron (Citrus medica) DNA, perhaps being an F2 hybrid.[5] Thus they cannot derive from true lemons, which have a mandarin orange component.

Uses

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Fruitlet of Ponderosa lemon

Ponderosa lemon is not widely grown commercially, but it is commonly grown as an ornamental plant. In areas where the winter's cold may damage the plant, they are grown in containers. In such cases they are usually grafted to dwarf rootstocks to help maintain a smaller, more manageable size. The impressive sized fruits may be left on the tree for many months after they've ripened without a drop in the fruits' quality. In addition, like citron, Ponderosa lemon trees can flower and bear fruit at the same time, further adding to the visual appeal.[6]

While the fruit are larger than that of a normal lemon, they have the same flavor and acidity. As such, the fruit can be used in place of true lemons. There is enough juice for several lemon pies in just one large Ponderosa lemon, and they can replace lemons measure for measure in recipes.[7]

References

  1. ^ Yuma Ponderosa at Citrus Variety Collection
  2. ^ a b Reuther, Walter; Leon Dexter Batchelor; Herbert John Webber (January 1967). "Horticultural Varieties of Citrus". Citrus Industry: Crop Protection. Volume I: History, World Distribution, Botany, and Varieties (revised ed.). University of California. Archived from the original on 2008-03-08.
  3. ^ "Ponderosa lemon hybrid". Citrus Variety Collection. University of California Riverside: College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences.
  4. ^ "Lemons". Home Fruit Production. Texas A&M University: Aggie Horticulture.
  5. ^ Curk, Franck; Ollitrault, Frédérique; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Luro, François; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick (2016). "Phylogenetic origin of limes and lemons revealed by cytoplasmic and nuclear markers". Annals of Botany. 11: 565–583. doi:10.1093/aob/mcw005. PMC 4817432. PMID 26944784.
  6. ^ Rodale, Jerome Irving (1971). The Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening. Rodale Books. p. 394. ISBN 0-87596-061-8. The Ponderosa bears fruit and flowers simultaneously, which makes the plant interesting as well as attractive. The fruits last extremely well on the plant, and may be allowed to remain on it for months without danger of deterioration.
  7. ^ Atta, Marian Van; Marlan Atta (2002). Exotic Foods: A Kitchen and Garden Guide (illustrated ed.). Pineapple Press Inc. p. 12. ISBN 1-56164-215-0.
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Ponderosa lemon: Brief Summary

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The ponderosa lemon (Citrus x pyriformis) is a citrus hybrid of a pomelo and a citron. It is not the same as the 'Yuma Ponderosa' lemon pomello hybrid, that is used as citrus rootstock.

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