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Hyssopus (plant)

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1885 illustration of H. officinalis[1]

Hyssopus (hyssop) is a genus of herbaceous or semi-woody plants in the family Lamiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to central Asia as far east as Mongolia.[2][3] They are aromatic, with erect branched stems up to 60 cm long covered with fine hairs at the tips. The leaves are narrow oblong, 2–5 cm long. The small blue flowers are borne on the upper part of the branches during summer. By far the best-known species is the herb hyssop (H. officinalis), widely cultivated outside its native area in the Mediterranean.

Though commonly called "hyssop", anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum; also called blue giant hyssop) and all Agastache species are not members of Hyssopus. However, both genera are in the mint family.

Species[2]
  1. Hyssopus ambiguus (Trautv.) Iljin ex Prochorov. & Lebel - Altai Republic of Russia, Kazakhstan
  2. Hyssopus cuspidatus Boriss. - Altai Republic, Kazakhstan, Xinjiang, Mongolia
  3. Hyssopus latilabiatus C.Y.Wu & H.W.Li - Xinjiang
  4. Hyssopus macranthus Boriss. - Altai Republic of Russia, Western Siberia, Kazakhstan
  5. Hyssopus officinalis L. - central + southern Europe, Algeria, Morocco, east to Iran
  6. Hyssopus seravschanicus (Dub.) Pazij - Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan
  7. Hyssopus subulifolius (Rech.f.) Rech.f. - Afghanistan.

History

The name hyssop can be traced back almost unchanged through the Greek ύσσωπος (hyssopos).[3] The name hyssop appears in some translations of the Bible, but researchers have suggested that the Biblical accounts refer not to the plant currently known as hyssop but rather to a related herb.[4][5] The Septuagint translates the name as ὕσσωπος hyssop, and English translations of the Bible often follow this rendering. The Hebrew word אזוב (esov or esob) and the Greek word ὕσσωπος probably share a common (unknown) origin.[6] The biblical plant is discussed further at ezov.

End Uses

The herb hyssop is used both as a condiment and a medicine. Hyssop leaves and flowers are used to flavor salads and soups. It is also used in the preparation of liquor and perfumes. In addition, it is used as a pot herb.[7]

This herb is used in the treatment of throat and lung complaints, and is regarded as a stimulant, carminative, and expectorant. It is also effective in treating nervous disorders and toothache. Additionally, it is useful for treating pulmonary, digestive, uterine, urinary and asthma problems. Its leaves are stimulant, stomachic, carminative, and soothing to colic, and its juice is used to treat roundworms.[8]

In addition to its use as a flavoring agent in bitters and tonics, hyssop oil is also used in perfumery. Various types of bronchial catarrh and asthma can be treated with it in small quantities.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Prof. Dr. Otto Wilhelm Thomé, Flora von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz 1885, Gera, Germany
  2. ^ a b Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  3. ^ a b "Spotlight on Hyssop". Retrieved 2008-09-16.
  4. ^ Fleisher, Alexander (1988). "Identification of biblical hyssop and origin of the traditional use of oregano-group herbs in the Mediterranean region". Economic Botany. 42 (2): 232–241. doi:10.1007/BF02858924. S2CID 45220405.
  5. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-31. Retrieved 2009-06-04.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1989, s.v. hyssop
  7. ^ "Hyssopus officinalis - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics".
  8. ^ "Hyssop: Health Benefits, Side Effects, Uses, Dose & Precautions".
  9. ^ "A Modern Herbal | Hyssop".

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Hyssopus (plant): Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
 src= 1885 illustration of H. officinalis

Hyssopus (hyssop) is a genus of herbaceous or semi-woody plants in the family Lamiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to central Asia as far east as Mongolia. They are aromatic, with erect branched stems up to 60 cm long covered with fine hairs at the tips. The leaves are narrow oblong, 2–5 cm long. The small blue flowers are borne on the upper part of the branches during summer. By far the best-known species is the herb hyssop (H. officinalis), widely cultivated outside its native area in the Mediterranean.

Though commonly called "hyssop", anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum; also called blue giant hyssop) and all Agastache species are not members of Hyssopus. However, both genera are in the mint family.

Species Hyssopus ambiguus (Trautv.) Iljin ex Prochorov. & Lebel - Altai Republic of Russia, Kazakhstan Hyssopus cuspidatus Boriss. - Altai Republic, Kazakhstan, Xinjiang, Mongolia Hyssopus latilabiatus C.Y.Wu & H.W.Li - Xinjiang Hyssopus macranthus Boriss. - Altai Republic of Russia, Western Siberia, Kazakhstan Hyssopus officinalis L. - central + southern Europe, Algeria, Morocco, east to Iran Hyssopus seravschanicus (Dub.) Pazij - Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan Hyssopus subulifolius (Rech.f.) Rech.f. - Afghanistan.
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