dcsimg

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dewey, T. . "Myomorpha" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Myomorpha.html
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dewey, T. . "Myomorpha" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Myomorpha.html
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dewey, T. . "Myomorpha" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Myomorpha.html
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Myomorpha

provided by wikipedia EN

The suborder Myomorpha contains 1,137 species of mouse-like rodents, nearly a quarter of all mammal species. Included are mice, rats, gerbils, hamsters, lemmings, and voles. They are grouped according to the structure of their jaws and molar teeth. They are characterized by their myomorphous zygomasseteric system, which means that both their medial and lateral masseter muscles are displaced forward, making them adept at gnawing. As in the hystricognathous rodents, the medial masseter muscle goes through the eye socket, a feature unique among mammals. Myomorphs are found worldwide (apart from Antarctica) in almost all land habitats. They are usually nocturnal seed-eaters.

Most myomorph species belong to the superfamily Muroidea: (hamsters, voles, lemmings, true mice, true rats, and gerbils).

Historically, the definition of the suborder Myomorpha has included one or both of:

References

  • Carleton, M. D. and G. G. Musser. 2005. Order Rodentia. Pp745–752 in Mammal Species of the World A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder eds.). Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Clutton-Brock, Juliet (ed.). 2004. Mouse-like Rodents. Pp150–159 in Animal (David Burnley ed.). London, Dorling Kindersley.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Myomorpha: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The suborder Myomorpha contains 1,137 species of mouse-like rodents, nearly a quarter of all mammal species. Included are mice, rats, gerbils, hamsters, lemmings, and voles. They are grouped according to the structure of their jaws and molar teeth. They are characterized by their myomorphous zygomasseteric system, which means that both their medial and lateral masseter muscles are displaced forward, making them adept at gnawing. As in the hystricognathous rodents, the medial masseter muscle goes through the eye socket, a feature unique among mammals. Myomorphs are found worldwide (apart from Antarctica) in almost all land habitats. They are usually nocturnal seed-eaters.

Most myomorph species belong to the superfamily Muroidea: (hamsters, voles, lemmings, true mice, true rats, and gerbils).

Superfamily Muroidea Family Platacanthomyidae (spiny dormice and Chinese pygmy dormice) Family Spalacidae (blind mole-rats and bamboo rats) Family Calomyscidae (mouse-like hamsters) Family Nesomyidae (Malagasy mice and rats and African climbing mice) Family Cricetidae (true hamsters, voles and lemmings) Family Muridae (true rats, true mice and gerbils) Superfamily Dipodoidea (jerboas and jumping mice) Family Dipodidae

Historically, the definition of the suborder Myomorpha has included one or both of:

Superfamily Geomyoidea (gophers and kangaroo rats) Family Heteromyidae (kangaroo rats) Family Geomyidae (gophers) Superfamily Gliroidea (true dormice) Family Gliridae
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN