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Distribution

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Continent: Middle-America North-America
Distribution: USA (New Mexico: Hidalgo County; Texas: Presidio County), Mexico
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Distribution

provided by ReptileDB
Continent: Middle-America North-America
Distribution: USA (SE Colorado, New Mexico, W Texas), Mexico (NE Chihuahua, Coahuila)
Type locality: Arkansas River, near Castle Rock Creek, Colorado (= Beaver Creek, Fremont County).
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Common checkered whiptail

provided by wikipedia EN

The checkered whiptail (Aspidoscelis tesselatus) is a species of lizard found in the southwestern United States in Colorado, Texas and New Mexico, and in northern Mexico in Chihuahua and Coahuila. Many sources believe that the species originated from the hybridization of the marbled whiptail, Aspidoscelis marmoratus, the plateau spotted whiptail, Aspidoscelis septemvittatus, and possibly the six-lined racerunner, Aspidoscelis sexlineatus. It is one of many lizard species known to be parthenogenic. It is sometimes referred to as the common checkered whiptail to differentiate it from several other species known as checkered whiptails.

Description

The checkered whiptail grows to about 4 inches in length. Their pattern and base coloration varies widely, with brown or black blotching, checkering or striping on a pale yellow or white base color. Their rear legs often have dark spotting, and their underside is usually white with dark flecking on the throat area. They are slender bodied, with a long tail.

Behavior

Like other species of whiptail lizard, the checkered whiptail is diurnal and insectivorous. They are wary, energetic, and fast moving, darting for cover if approached. They are found in semi-arid, rocky habitats, normally in canyon lands or hilled regions. They are parthenogenic, laying up to eight unfertilized eggs in mid summer, which hatch in six to eight weeks.

References

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Common checkered whiptail: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The checkered whiptail (Aspidoscelis tesselatus) is a species of lizard found in the southwestern United States in Colorado, Texas and New Mexico, and in northern Mexico in Chihuahua and Coahuila. Many sources believe that the species originated from the hybridization of the marbled whiptail, Aspidoscelis marmoratus, the plateau spotted whiptail, Aspidoscelis septemvittatus, and possibly the six-lined racerunner, Aspidoscelis sexlineatus. It is one of many lizard species known to be parthenogenic. It is sometimes referred to as the common checkered whiptail to differentiate it from several other species known as checkered whiptails.

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Gray checkered whiptail

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The gray checkered whiptail (Aspidoscelis dixoni ) is a species of lizard in the family Teiidae. The species is native to the United States in southern New Mexico and western Texas, and northern Mexico.[2]

Taxonomy

Some sources consider the gray checkered whiptail to be a subspecies of the common checkered whiptail, Aspidoscelis tesselatus,[2] whereas others grant it full species status.[1] It is one of many lizard species known to be parthenogenetic.[2]

Etymology

The epithet, dixoni, is in homage of renowned American herpetologist James R. Dixon,[3] which leads some sources to refer to it as Dixon's whiptail.

Description

The gray checkered whiptail grows to between 20 and 30 centimetres (8 and 12 in) in total length (including tail). It is typically gray in color, with 10–12 white or yellow stripes that go the length of the body, often with spotting or checkering on the stripes. It is thin-bodied, with a long tail.

Behavior and diet

Like most whiptail lizards, the gray checkered whiptail is diurnal and insectivorous. It is wary, energetic, and fast moving, darting for cover if approached.

Habitat

The preferred habitat of A. dixoni is rocky, semi-arid areas with sparse vegetation.

Reproduction

A. dixoni is parthenogenic, females lay unfertilized eggs in the mid-summer, which hatch in approximately six weeks.

References

  1. ^ a b Hammerson GA (2007). "Aspidoscelis dixoni ". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2007. Retrieved 6 July 2015.old-form url
  2. ^ a b c d Aspidoscelis tesselatus at the Reptarium.cz Reptile Database. Accessed 6 July 2015.
  3. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (2011). The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. xiii + 296 pp. ISBN 978-1-4214-0135-5. (Aspidoscelis dixoni, p. 73).

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Gray checkered whiptail: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The gray checkered whiptail (Aspidoscelis dixoni ) is a species of lizard in the family Teiidae. The species is native to the United States in southern New Mexico and western Texas, and northern Mexico.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN