dcsimg

Comments

provided by eFloras
Verdcourt (in Milne-Redhead & Polhill, Fl.Trop.E.Afr.(Leguminosae 4) 653.1971) recognises 3 varieties.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 246 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Description

provided by eFloras
Perennial climbing or trailing herb. Stem glabrescent or at least not densely pubescent. Leaf trifoliolate, petiole 1.5-11.0 cm long, leaflets 2.5-8.0 cm long, 0.5-25 mm broad, ovate to lanceolate, acute or acuminate, glabrescent or not densely pubescent; petiolules 2-4 mm long; stipules 5-13 mm long. Inflorescence axillary 2-6-flowered, subumbellate. Peduncle 4.5-36 cm long. Pedicel 1-2 mm long. Bracteoles 5-8 mm long. Calyx pubescent, tube 5-7 mm long, teeth 2.0-8.0 mm long, the upper pair partly united. Corolla yellow, pink or purple, glabrous. Vexillum 2.0-3.5 cm long. Fruit 4-14 cm long, 2.5-4.0 mm broad, pubescent, hairs stiff, dark brown, 10-18-seeded.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 246 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Distribution

provided by eFloras
Distribution: Cosmopolitan in Tropics including Pakistan.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 246 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Flower/Fruit

provided by eFloras
Fl.Per.: September-October.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 246 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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visit source
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eFloras

Physical Description

provided by USDA PLANTS text
Perennial, Herbs, Vines, twining, climbing, Stems woody below, or from woody crown or caudex, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems prostrate, trailing, or mat forming, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems 1-2 m tall, Stems greater than 2 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules green, triangulate to lanceolate or foliaceous, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Stipules cordate, lobed, or sagittate, Leaves compound, Leaves pinnately 3-foliolate, Leaves odd pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Stipels pre sent at base of leaflets, Leaflets 3, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Flowers in axillary clusters or few-floweredracemes, 2-6 flowers, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence axillary, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Bracteoles present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 4-lobed, Calyx glabrous, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals blue, lavander to purple, or violet, Banner petal suborbicular, broadly rounded, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing petals auriculate, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel abruptly curved, or spirally coiled, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style hairy, Style with distal tuft of hairs, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit exserted from calyx, Valves twisting or coiling after dehiscence, Fruit hairy, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds ovoid to rounded in outline, Seeds ren iform, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black, Seed surface mottled or patchy.
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Dr. David Bogler
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Missouri Botanical Garden
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USDA NRCS NPDC
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USDA PLANTS text

Vigna vexillata

provided by wikipedia EN

Vigna vexillata (Zombi pea, wild cowpea) is a variable, perennial climbing plant that is pantropical, found in regions such as Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Venezuela.

Description

Vigna vexillata is a strong twiner with fusiform, tuberous roots. Its stems are usually clothed with brownish silky hairs, or trichomes.. Its leaflets come in three, which are oval-shaped and pointed at the tip, with the terminal leaflet being 7.5–15 cm (3.0–5.9 in) long. The leaflets are all a dark green and with appressed trichomes on both surfaces. The flowers are pink or purplish to yellow and 2.5 cm (0.98 in) long, on two- to four-flowered peduncles 7.5–30 cm (3.0–11.8 in) long, with the keel prolonged into an uncurved beak. The flowers are sweetly scented.[1] The pod is recurved, linear, 7.5–9 cm (3.0–3.5 in) long, and silky.[2]

The stems tend to scramble over the ground and twine into the surrounding vegetation.[3] It has good seedling vigor and good wet-season growth, and is effective in weed suppression. The seed shatters and it is not a good standover feed for the dry season. It is susceptible to both frost and fire. Although hairy, the plant is quite palatable.[4]

Habitat and Ecology

Vigna vexillata thrives in a wide range of conditions, mostly in grasslands and in disturbed areas, as well as a weed.[4]

In India, the plant flourishes from 1,200–1,500 m (3,900–4,900 ft) in altitude in the foothills of the Himalayas and in the hills of eastern and north-eastern India.[4]

In Australia, it grows in the north where monsoons with 1,250–1,500 mm (49–59 in) of rainfall and a long dry season are common, growing on acidic soils rich in aluminum.[4]

Uses

The plant is a very important food crop in several areas, such as Namibia, where it is commonly harvested from the wild for local use. Its use has spread beyond its native range and the plant is now sometimes cultivated for its edible tubers. It is also grown as a green manure and ground cover crop, especially in poor soils.[5]

The root is consumed raw or cooked. The tubers have a soft, easily peeled skin and creamy flesh. They are boiled or roasted and are particularly rich in protein. The young leaves, young pods, and seeds are also cooked and eaten as a vegetable.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Umberto Quattrocchi (2016). CRC World Dictionary of Medicinal and Poisonous Plants: Common Names, Scientific Names, Eponyms, Synonyms, and Etymology (reprint ed.). CRC Press. p. 3909. ISBN 9781482250640.
  2. ^ Mari Sivaswani Palaniswami, Kuruppacharil Varkey Peter (2008). Tuber & Root Crops. Horticulture science series. 9. New India Publishing. p. 67. ISBN 9788189422530.
  3. ^ "Vigna vexillata in Flora of China".
  4. ^ a b c d PROSEA : Plant Resources of South-East Asia. 11, Auxiliary Plants. Yayasan Obor Indonesia. p. 261. ISBN 9789797990930.
  5. ^ "Vigna vexillata in African Plant Database".
  6. ^ National Research Council (2002). Tropical Legumes: Resources for the Future. The Minerva Group, Inc. p. 36. ISBN 9780894991929.
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Vigna vexillata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Vigna vexillata (Zombi pea, wild cowpea) is a variable, perennial climbing plant that is pantropical, found in regions such as Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Venezuela.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN