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Mountain Witchalder

Fothergilla major (Sims) Lodd.

Comments

provided by eFloras
The disjunct occurrence of Fothergilla major in Arkansas is a recent discovery.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Shrubs , 7-65 dm; branches robust. Leaves: stipules 2.8-7(-10.2) mm; petioles 3-10(-18) mm. Leaf blade broadly elliptic or somewhat orbiculate to obovate, asymmetric, 2.5-13.5 × 4.2-12.5 cm, base rounded to truncate, rarely cuneate, often oblique, proximal margins entire, distal margins coarsely sinuate to repand, rarely entire, apex short-acuminate to rounded and mucronate; surfaces abaxially glaucous or green, adaxially green, both surfaces stellate-pubescent or nearly glabrous; veins (4-)5-6(-7) pairs. Inflorescences nearly sessile to short-pedunculate, 3-6 × 2-3 cm. Flowers : calyx lobes persistent in fruit; stamens (10-)22-34; filaments 6-17 mm. Fruiting spikes 3.5-7 × 1.5-2.5 cm. Capsules 5.5-13 mm. Seeds 5-6(-8) mm, apex pointed. 2 n = 72.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Distribution

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Ala., Ark., Ga., N.C., S.C., Tenn.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering spring (Apr-May).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

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Bluffs, dry rocky woodlands, talus slopes, riverbanks, upper piedmont to mountains; 150-1300m.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Synonym

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Fothergilla monticola Ashe
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Fothergilla major

provided by wikipedia EN

Fothergilla major, the large witch alder or mountain witch alder, is a species of flowering plant in the genus Fothergilla, family Hamamelidaceae, that is native to woodland and swamps in the Allegheny Mountains and southern Appalachian Mountains of the southeastern United States.[3] It is a deciduous shrub growing to 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in) with fragrant white bottlebrush flowers appearing along with, or before, the glossy leaves. The leaves often turn brilliant shades of red and orange in autumn.[4]

Fothergilla major prefers full sun to part shade and is disease and insect resistant.[5] It thrives in moist, acidic soils, but is fairly drought tolerant.[3] It is hardy in USDA hardiness zones 4–8.[6]

This plant is named for the English physician and plant collector John Fothergill (1712-1780). The Latin specific epithet major means "larger".[7] It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[8][9]

References

  1. ^ Fothergilla major NatureServe
  2. ^ "Fothergilla latifolia (Large Fothergilla, Large Witch-alder)". NC State Extensiona. Retrieved 25 February 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Fothergilla major - Plant Finder". www.missouribotanicalgarden.org. Retrieved 2021-02-25.
  4. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964.
  5. ^ "Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center - The University of Texas at Austin". www.wildflower.org. Retrieved 2021-02-25.
  6. ^ "Fothergilla latifolia (Large Fothergilla, Large Witch-alder) | North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox". plants.ces.ncsu.edu. Retrieved 2021-02-25.
  7. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315.
  8. ^ "Fothergilla major AGM". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 5 July 2020.
  9. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 39. Retrieved 27 February 2018.

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Fothergilla major: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Fothergilla major, the large witch alder or mountain witch alder, is a species of flowering plant in the genus Fothergilla, family Hamamelidaceae, that is native to woodland and swamps in the Allegheny Mountains and southern Appalachian Mountains of the southeastern United States. It is a deciduous shrub growing to 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in) with fragrant white bottlebrush flowers appearing along with, or before, the glossy leaves. The leaves often turn brilliant shades of red and orange in autumn.

Fothergilla major prefers full sun to part shade and is disease and insect resistant. It thrives in moist, acidic soils, but is fairly drought tolerant. It is hardy in USDA hardiness zones 4–8.

This plant is named for the English physician and plant collector John Fothergill (1712-1780). The Latin specific epithet major means "larger". It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

Witch alder (4411832034).jpg Fothergilla major4.jpg
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