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Comprehensive Description

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Sedum ternatum Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1 : 277. 1803
Sedum portulacoides y^iWA. Enum. Hort. Berol. 484. 1809.
Sedum deficiens Donn, Hort. Cantab, ed. 6. 126. 1811.
Anacampseros ternata Haw. Syn. PI. Succ. 114, 1812.
Sedum. am-ericanum Banks ; Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept. 324, as synonym. 1814.
Sedum, octogonuTn DC. Prodr. 3 : 403, as synonym. 1827.
Perennial by rootstocks, glabrous, tufted ; stems creeping, flowering branches 0.7-2 dm. high. lyower leaves and those of sterile shoots flat, obovate, entire, 1-2.5 cm. long, sometimes 2 cm. wide, rounded at the apex, cuneate at the base or narrowed into a petiole, verticillate in 3's ; upper leaves oblanceolate or oblong, alternate, sessile ; cyme 2-4-forked, its branches spreading or recurved in flower ; flowers rather distant, often leafy-bracted, about 1 cm. broad ; petals linear-lanceolate, acute, nearly twice the length of the oblong obtuse sepals ; follicles 5 mm. long, tipped with the slender style.
Type locality : On rocks, western Pennsylvania, Virginia and Carolina. Distribution : On rocks, New York and New Jersey to Georgia, Indiana, Michigan and Tennessee.
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bibliographic citation
John Kunkel SmaII, George Valentine Nash, Nathaniel Lord Britton, Joseph Nelson Rose, Per Axel Rydber. 1905. ROSALES, PODOSTEMONACEAE, CRASSULACEAE, PENTHORACEAE and PARNASSIACEAE. North American flora. vol 22(1). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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Comprehensive Description

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Sedum ternatum
Add to the illustrations: Britt. & Brown, 111. Pi. ed. 2. /. 2141; G. T. Stevens, 111. Guide pi. 58, f. 8.
70. Insert:
50a. Sedum clavifolium Rose, Contr. U. S. Nat. Herb. 13: 297. 1911.
Perennial, branching at base and forming dense mats. Basal leaves and lower stemleaves 1-3 cm. long, thickened but flattened above, tapering below into long, slender, nearly terete pedicels, obtuse; stem 1-3 cm. high (in cultivated specimens 8 cm.); stemleaves similar to the basal but smaller, alternate; inflorescence a few-flowered cyme; pedicels 5-8 mm. long; sepals 5, distinct, green, unequal, spreading, thick and clubshaped, rounded at the apex, all longer than the petals; petals widely spreading, or even reflexed between the sepals, somewhat cup-shaped beyond the sepals, obtuse, pale greenish-yellow, about 3 mm. long; stamens 10, the five opposite the petals borne upon them, the other five distinct; scales 5, large, deep-red, erect, more or less lobed and toothed at the apex; carpels 5, ovate, erect even in fruit, tipped by very short styles; seeds oblong, several in each cell.
Type locality: Above timber line on Ixtaccihuatl, Mexico (state). Distribution: Known only from the type locality.
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bibliographic citation
Per Axel Rydberg. 1918. ROSACEAE (conclusio). North American flora. vol 22(6). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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Sedum ternatum

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Sedum ternatum is the most widespread native Sedum species in eastern North America, commonly known as woodland stonecrop.[1] It has white flowers, blooming April to May. This shade-tolerant species is often found in the forest understory, although it can also grow in sunnier locations when sufficient moisture is present. Its common name of "stonecrop" evokes its ability to thrive atop boulders, where its succulent leaves help it to retain moisture in shallow soil. It adapts well to garden use.

Sedum ternatum is native to much of the eastern United States, as far west as Arkansas and Iowa, south down the Appalachian Mountains, and north to near the Canada–United States border.

Sedum ternatum can be distinguished from other sedums, native and cultivated, which are commonly found in the United States by the white flowers with four (not five) petals, and by the leaves in whorls of three, whence the species name.[2] The plant flowers for about a month in late spring to early summer.[2]

References

  1. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Sedum ternatum". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Wild Stonecrop (Sedum ternatum)".
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Sedum ternatum: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Sedum ternatum is the most widespread native Sedum species in eastern North America, commonly known as woodland stonecrop. It has white flowers, blooming April to May. This shade-tolerant species is often found in the forest understory, although it can also grow in sunnier locations when sufficient moisture is present. Its common name of "stonecrop" evokes its ability to thrive atop boulders, where its succulent leaves help it to retain moisture in shallow soil. It adapts well to garden use.

Sedum ternatum is native to much of the eastern United States, as far west as Arkansas and Iowa, south down the Appalachian Mountains, and north to near the Canada–United States border.

Sedum ternatum can be distinguished from other sedums, native and cultivated, which are commonly found in the United States by the white flowers with four (not five) petals, and by the leaves in whorls of three, whence the species name. The plant flowers for about a month in late spring to early summer.

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