dcsimg

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Potentilla simplex Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1 : 303. 1803
Potentilla canadensis simplex T. & G. Fl. N. Am. 1 : 443. 1840. Callionia simplex Greene, Leaflets 1 : 238. 1906.
Perennial, with a short roostock; stem slender, first erect, soon decumbent, 4-10 dm. long, appressed-pubescent; basal leaves digitately 5-foliolate; petioles 5-8 cm. long, appressed-pubescent ; leaflets 2-6 cm. long, oblanceolate or oblong-oblanceolate, rarely obovate, coarsely toothed except the lower one fourth or one third, rather dark-green, glabrous or nearly so above, appressed-silky especially on the veins beneath, usually acute at both ends ; stem-leaves similar but short-petioled and always narrow ; stipules lanceolate, 1-1.5 cm. long, acuminate, entire or toothed; peduncles 3.5 cm. long, appressed-pubescent; bractlets linear-lanceolate, 4-5 mm. long, equaling or slightly exceeding the similar but slightly broader sepals; petals broadly obcordate, 5-6 mm. long; stamens 20-25; styles slender, filiform.
Type locality : Canada.
Distribution : Open woods and among grass, Nova Scotia to Minnesota, Missouri, and the mountains of Alabama and North Carolina.
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bibliographic citation
Per Axel Rydberg. 1908. ROSACEAE (pars). North American flora. vol 22(4). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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North American Flora

Potentilla simplex

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Potentilla simplex, also known as common cinquefoil or old-field five-fingers or oldfield cinquefoil, is a perennial herb in the Rosaceae (rose) family native to eastern North America from Ontario, Quebec, and Labrador south to Texas, Alabama, and panhandle Florida.[1][2]

Potentilla simplex is a familiar plant with prostrate stems that root at nodes, with yellow flowers and 5-parted palmately pinnate leaves arising from stolons (runners) on separate stalks. Complete flowers bearing 5 yellow petals (about 4-10 mm long) bloom from March to June. It bears seed from April to July. It is commonly found in woodlands, fields, and disturbed areas.[2][3] Along with Potentilla canadensis, the plant is an indicator of impoverished soil.[4]

Pollinators include mason bees, small carpenter bees, cuckoo bees, halictid bees, syrphid flies, tachinid flies, blow flies, and others. Less common pollinators are wasps and butterflies. Rabbits and groundhogs eat the foliage.[5]

Young shoots and leaves are edible as a salad or pot herb.[6]

References

  1. ^ Weakley, Alan S. (May 2015). Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States. Chapel Hill, NC, USA: The University of North Carolina Herbarium. p. 585–587.
  2. ^ a b "Plants Profile for Potentilla simplex (common cinquefoil)". USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Retrieved 28 Mar 2016.
  3. ^ "Common Cinquefoil (Potentilla simplex)". Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Retrieved 28 Mar 2016.
  4. ^ Niering, William A.; Olmstead, Nancy C. (1985) [1979]. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildflowers, Eastern Region. Knopf. p. 753. ISBN 0-394-50432-1.
  5. ^ "Potentilla simplex (common cinquefoil)". John Hilty. Retrieved 28 Mar 2016.
  6. ^ "Cinquefoil Herb Use". Alternative Nature Herbals. Retrieved 28 Mar 2016.

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Potentilla simplex: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Potentilla simplex, also known as common cinquefoil or old-field five-fingers or oldfield cinquefoil, is a perennial herb in the Rosaceae (rose) family native to eastern North America from Ontario, Quebec, and Labrador south to Texas, Alabama, and panhandle Florida.

Potentilla simplex is a familiar plant with prostrate stems that root at nodes, with yellow flowers and 5-parted palmately pinnate leaves arising from stolons (runners) on separate stalks. Complete flowers bearing 5 yellow petals (about 4-10 mm long) bloom from March to June. It bears seed from April to July. It is commonly found in woodlands, fields, and disturbed areas. Along with Potentilla canadensis, the plant is an indicator of impoverished soil.

Pollinators include mason bees, small carpenter bees, cuckoo bees, halictid bees, syrphid flies, tachinid flies, blow flies, and others. Less common pollinators are wasps and butterflies. Rabbits and groundhogs eat the foliage.

Young shoots and leaves are edible as a salad or pot herb.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN