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Carolina Springbeauty

Claytonia caroliniana Michx.

Description

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Plants perennial, with globose tubers 10-20 mm diam.; periderm 1-5 mm. Stems 6-25 cm. Leaves: basal leaves 6-21, petiolate, blade elliptic or spatulate, 3-5 × 1-3 cm; cauline leaves abruptly petiolate, blade lanceolate to spatulate or ovate, 4-8 × 0.5-2.5 cm. Inflorescences 1-bracteate (rarely with 2 bracts). Flowers 8-12 mm diam.; sepals 3-5 mm; petals white, pink, or candy-striped, 6-10 mm; ovules 6. Seeds 2-4 mm, shiny and smooth; elaiosome 1-2 mm. 2n = 16, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 38.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 4: 466, 467 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Distribution

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N.B., Nfld. and Labr. (Nfld.), N.S., Ont., P.E.I., Que.; Conn., Ga., Iowa, Ky., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., N.H., N.Y., N.C., Pa., Tenn., Vt., Va., W.Va., Wis.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 4: 466, 467 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering Mar-Jun.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 4: 466, 467 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Habitat

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Wetlands and riparian hardwood forests; 0-1400m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 4: 466, 467 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Claytonia caroliniana var. lewisii McNeill; C. caroliniana var. spatulifolia (Salisbury) W. H. Lewis
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 4: 466, 467 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Claytonia caroliniana Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 160. 1803
Claylonia lirginica Ait. Hort. Kew. 1: 2S4. 17S9. Claytonia spalulaefolia Salisb. Parad. Lond. pi. 71. 180' Claylonia spalhulaefolia Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept. 174. 1S14. Claylonia spalulala Eat. Man. ed. 2. 207. 1818. Claylonia virginica lalifolia Torr. Fl. I'. S. 259. 1824. Claylonia spalhulata Bigel. Fl. Bost. ed. 2. 98. 1824. Claylonia virginica spalhulaefolia DC. Prodr. 3: 361. 1828. Claylonia lalifolia Sheldon. Minn. Bot. Stad. 1: 15. 1894.
Corm globose, about 1 cm. thick; stems 1-3 from each corm, erect or ascending, 6-20 cm. high; basal leaves 4-15 cm. long, slender, petioled, the blade elliptic or spatulate, 3-5 cm. long, 1-2 cm. wide, acute to rounded at apex; stem-leaves petioled, 4-S cm. long, the blade lanceolate to spatulate, acute to rounded at the apex; raceme 5-10-flowered, 4—10 cm. long, usually without bracts; pedicels 1.5-3 cm. long; sepals ovate, mostly acutish, 6-7 mm. long; petals about 1 cm. long, oval, rounded or obtuse at the apex; capsule 4 mm. long; seeds almost black, orbicular, 2 mm. broad.
Type locality: Higher mountains of Carolina.
Distribution: Woods, especially in the mountains. Nova Scotia to Minnesota, Tennessee, and North Carolina.
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bibliographic citation
Percy Wilson, Per Axel Rydberg. 1932. CHENOPODIALES. North American flora. vol 21(4). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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Claytonia caroliniana

provided by wikipedia EN

Claytonia caroliniana, the Carolina springbeauty, is an herbaceous perennial in the family Montiaceae. It was formerly placed in the Portulacaceae. Its native range is eastern and central North America. It is most commonly found in the New England area of the United States but its habitat extends from Ontario and a northern limit in the Cape Anguille Mountains of Newfoundland and south to Alabama.[1] It grows approximately 6 inches tall in forests of the Appalachian Mountains and piedmont[3][4]

Description

Claytonia caroliniana is a flowering, woodland perennial herb.[5][4] It grows from March though June and is one of the earliest spring ephemerals.[4] The plant grows from spherical underground tubers in light humus. They sprout and bloom before the tree canopy develops. Once the area is shaded, the plants whither leaving only the tuberous roots underground.[6]

The flowers consist of five pink and purple petals. Dark pink veins accent the petals and give them a striped appearance.[6] The carpels are fused together.[4] They grow on a stem 3 - 10 inches tall that bears a single pair of broad leaves.[4] This distinguishes it from Claytonia virginica, which, although similar in other ways, has longer and much narrower leaves.[7] Claytonia caroliniana is similar to some of the Arctic claytonias, but is probably allied to Claytonia ozarkensis. Natural hybrids with Claytonia virginica have been documented[8]

There are two green leaves that grow opposite each other on a node. The leaf has no teeth or lobes and a prominent central vein.[4][7] They grow up to three inches long and 1/2 to 3/4 inches wide.[7]

Uses

The plant is edible but its usability is limited due to difficulty harvesting and the small quantities each plant produces. Its tuberous roots are edible and rich in starch and can be cooked or eaten raw .[6] The leaves can be eaten as well. The tuberous roots are eaten by eastern chipmunks and white-footed mice.[6]

History

The plant was named after John Clayton.[9] Clayton was an early collector of plant specimens in Virginia.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Claytonia caroliniana". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved September 8, 2013.
  2. ^ "Claytonia caroliniana". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (WCSP). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew – via The Plant List.
  3. ^ Miller, J. M. and K. L. Chambers. 2006. Systematics of Claytonia (Portulacaceae). Systematic Botany Monographs 78: 1-236. ISBN 0-912861-78-9
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Claytonia caroliniana (Carolina spring-beauty)". Go Botany. New England Wildflower Society.
  5. ^ a b "Adirondack Wildflowers: Carolina Springbeauty | Claytonia caroliniana". www.adirondackvic.org. Retrieved 2017-06-10.
  6. ^ a b c d "Adirondack Wildflowers: Carolina Springbeauty | Claytonia caroliniana". wildadirondacks.org. Retrieved 2017-06-10.
  7. ^ a b c Chayka, Katy; Dziuk, Peter (2016). "Claytonia caroliniana (Carolina Spring Beauty)". Minnesota Wildflowers. Retrieved 2017-06-10.
  8. ^ Miller, J. M. and K. L. Chambers. 2006. Systematics of Claytonia (Portulacaceae). Systematic Botany Monographs 78: 1-236. ISBN 0-912861-78-9
  9. ^ "John Clayton". Encyclopedia Virginia.

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Claytonia caroliniana: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Claytonia caroliniana, the Carolina springbeauty, is an herbaceous perennial in the family Montiaceae. It was formerly placed in the Portulacaceae. Its native range is eastern and central North America. It is most commonly found in the New England area of the United States but its habitat extends from Ontario and a northern limit in the Cape Anguille Mountains of Newfoundland and south to Alabama. It grows approximately 6 inches tall in forests of the Appalachian Mountains and piedmont

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Claytonie de Caroline

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Claytonia caroliniana

La Claytonie de Caroline[1] (Claytonia caroliniana) est une espèce de plantes herbacées de la famille des Portulacaceae selon la classification classique ou de la famille des Montiaceae selon la classification phylogénétique (APGIII).

Elle est aussi connue sous le nom de claytonie feuille-large[1].

Notes et références

  1. a et b Luc Brouillet et al., « Claytonia caroliniana Michaux », sur VASCAN, la Base de données des plantes vasculaires du Canada, 2010+ (consulté le 25 septembre 2011)

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Claytonie de Caroline: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Claytonia caroliniana

La Claytonie de Caroline (Claytonia caroliniana) est une espèce de plantes herbacées de la famille des Portulacaceae selon la classification classique ou de la famille des Montiaceae selon la classification phylogénétique (APGIII).

Elle est aussi connue sous le nom de claytonie feuille-large.

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