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Gray's Biscuitroot

Lomatium grayi (Coult. & Rose) Coult. & Rose

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Lomatium grayi Coult. & Rose, Contr. U. S. Nat. Herb. 7: 229. 1900.
Peucedanum millefolium S. Wats. Bot. King's Expl. 129. 1871. Not P. millefolium Sonder 1861-
1862. Peucedanum Grayi Coult. & Rose, Bot. Gaz. 13: 209. 1888. Peucedanum Grayi var. aberrans M. E. Jones, Contr. W. Bot. 10: 55. 1902. Leplotaenia filicina M. E. Jones, Contr. W. Bot. 10: 56. 1902. Cogswellia millefolia M. E. Jones, Contr. W. Bot. 12: 35. 1908. Cogswellia Grayi Coult. & Rose, Contr. U. S. Nat. Herb. 12: 450. 1909. Lomatium millefolium F. Macbr. Contr. Gray Herb. 53: 15. 1918.
Plants acaulescent or short-caulescent, 2-6.1 dm. high, from a long thickened taproot; leaves broadly obovate in general outline, excluding the petioles 10.5-26 cm. long, glabrous to scaberulous, 1-2-ternate or quinate, then 2-3-pinnate, the ultimate divisions crowded, linear to filiform, 1-11 mm. long, 0.1-0.25 mm. broad, entire, mucronulate; petioles 3.5-22 cm. long, sheathing at the base; peduncles exceeding the leaves; involucel of filiform, entire, occasionally toothed bractlets, usually shorter than the flowers, rarely deciduous; rays 7-22, spreading, 2-15 cm. long; pedicels 6-22 mm. long, the umbellets 15-30-flowered; flowers yellow; fruit ovate-oblong to oblong, 7-16 mm. long, 5-8 mm. broad, the wings much narrower than to equaling the body; oil-tubes solitary in the intervals, rarely 2 or 3, especially in the lateral, 2-4, rarely 6, on the commissure.
Type locality: Antelope Island, Salt Lake, Utah. Watson 466.
Distribution: Western Wyoming and Colorado to eastern Washington and Oregon and northeastern Nevada, 750-8400 feet (Heller & Heller 3043, Jones 5548).
50a. Lomatium Grayi var. depauperatum (M. E. Jones) Mathias, Ann. Mo. Bot. Gard. 25: 270. 1937.
Cogswellia millefolia var. depauperate M. E. Jones, Contr. W. Bot. 12: 38. 1908.
Usually lower; leaves dissected into few, small, remote, linear ultimate divisions.
Type locality: Dugway, Utah, Jones.
Distribution: Western Utah and adjacent Nevada (Cottam 4533, Jones 25,253).
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bibliographic citation
Albert Charles Smith, Mildred Esther Mathias, Lincoln Constance, Harold William Rickett. 1944-1945. UMBELLALES and CORNALES. North American flora. vol 28B. New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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North American Flora

Lomatium grayi

provided by wikipedia EN

Lomatium grayi, commonly known as Gray's biscuitroot, Gray's desert parsley, or pungent desert parsley, is a perennial herb of the family Apiaceae. It is native to Western Canada in British Columbia, and the Western United States, including from the Eastern Cascades and northeastern California to the Rocky Mountains.[1][2]

It is a perennial herb found growing in dry rocky banks and slopes.[3] It has a lifespan of 5–7 years.

Description

Lomatium grayi has glabrous stems that split at the ground, and a long, thick taproot. It flowers from March to July with 1–20 compound umbels, each with hundreds of yellow flowers.[3][4]The fruit is glabrous, elliptic, 8-15 mm long, with the lateral wings about half as wide as the body.[5]

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Mature seeds of Lomatium grayi
Varieties
  • Lomatium grayi var. depauperatum — Gray's biscuitroot (M.E. Jones) Mathias; endemic to northeastern Nevada and northwestern Utah.[6]
  • Lomatium grayi var. grayi — Gray's biscuitroot.[4][7]

Taxonomy

A 2018 study has proposed splitting L. grayi into four species, based on morphometric analysis: Lomatium klickitatense in Klickitat County, Washington and surrounding areas; Lomatium papilioniferum in the rest of the Pacific Northwest; Lomatium depauperatum (formerly L. grayi var. depauperatum) in western Utah and eastern Nevada; and Lomatium grayi s.s. in the western Rocky Mountains and adjoining basins.[8]

Uses

The plant was used as a food source by the Northern Paiute people in Oregon; new tender stems were eaten raw, and the roots were a winter 'starvation food.'[9]

See also

Habitats include:

References

  1. ^ USDA: Lomatium grayi; info + native distribution map . accessed 1.8.2013
  2. ^ Consortium of California Herbaria (Jepson): Lomatium grayi distribution. accessed 1.8.2013
  3. ^ a b Lomatium grayi in Jepson Flora Project (eds.) Jepson eFlora, info + detailed distribution map . accessed 1.8.2013
  4. ^ a b Burke Museum—WTU Herbarium: Lomatium grayi — info + images . accessed 1.8.2013
  5. ^ Burke Museum—WTU Herbarium: Lomatium papilioniferum accessed May 22, 2021
  6. ^ USDA Plants Profile: Lomatium grayi var. depauperatum — (Gray's biscuitroot) . accessed 1.8.2013
  7. ^ USDA: Lomatium grayi var. depauperatum — (Gray's biscuitroot) . accessed 1.8.2013
  8. ^ Alexander, J. A.; Whaley, W.; Blain, N. (2018). "The Lomatium grayi complex (Apiaceae) of the western United States: a taxonomic revision based on morphometric, essential oil composition, and larva-host coevolution studies". Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas. 12 (2): 387–444.
  9. ^ Native American Ethnobotany (University of Michigan - Dearborn) . accessed 1.8.2013

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Lomatium grayi: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Lomatium grayi, commonly known as Gray's biscuitroot, Gray's desert parsley, or pungent desert parsley, is a perennial herb of the family Apiaceae. It is native to Western Canada in British Columbia, and the Western United States, including from the Eastern Cascades and northeastern California to the Rocky Mountains.

It is a perennial herb found growing in dry rocky banks and slopes. It has a lifespan of 5–7 years.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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