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Douglas' Sagewort

Artemisia douglasiana Bess.

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Artemisia douglasiana is sometimes weedy. Reports from areas outside the northwestern portion of the United States are based on misidentifications of plants in the A. ludoviciana complex.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of North America Vol. 19: 522, 524, 533 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Description

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Perennials, 50–180(–250) cm, aromatic (rhizomatous). Stems 1–20, erect, brown to gray-green, simple, hairy or glabrescent. Leaves cauline, bicolor (white and green to light gray-green); blades narrowly elliptic to widely oblanceolate, (1–)3–11(–15) × 0.5–2(–6) cm (proximal with 3–5 lateral lobes, distal mostly entire), faces sparsely tomentose (abaxial) to sparsely hairy (adaxial). Heads (usually nodding) in (leafy) paniculiform arrays 10–30 × 3–9 cm (branches widely spreading, ascending, stout). Involucres narrowly turbinate to campanulate, 2–3 × 2–4 mm. Phyllaries (green to gray) ovate, tomentose to pubescent. Florets: pistillate 6–10; bisexual 6–25; corollas pale yellow, 1–1.5 mm, glabrous, sometimes glandular. Cypselae ellipsoid, 0.5–1 mm, glabrous. 2n = 54.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 19: 522, 524, 533 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Artemisia campestris Linnaeus var. douglasiana (Besser) B. Boivin; A. caudata Michaux var. douglasiana (Besser) B. Boivin; A. commutata Besser var. douglasiana (Besser) Besser; A. desertorum Sprengel var. douglasiana Besser; A. heterophylla Nuttall; A. ludoviciana Nuttall var. douglasiana (Besser) D. C. Eaton; A. vulgaris Linnaeus var. douglasiana (Besser) H. St. John
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 19: 522, 524, 533 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Artemisia douglasiana Besser; Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 323
1833.
Artem««o fji/egri/oZia l/css. Linnaea 6: 523. 1831. Not A. inlegrifoUal,. 1753. Artemisia vulgaris califomica Besser, Linnaea 15: 91. 1841.
Artemisia vulgaris Douglasiana D.C. Eaton, in S. Wats. Bot. King's Expl. 183. 1871. Artemisia Kennedyi A. Nelson, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 18: 175. 1905.
A stout pereimial, with a rootstock; stem 6-10 dm. high, simple, striate, somewhat tomentose; leaves numerous, 5-15 cm. long, lanceolate, acuminate, the lower more or less lobed or toothed, with few lanceolate lobes or teeth, the upper ones entire, all somewhat grayish-floccose above when young, glabrate in age, permanently white-tomentose beneath; heads numerous, at first nodding, in a large dense narrow leafy panicle 3-5 dm. long; involucre rounded-campanulate, 4 mm. high, 3-4 mm. broad; bracts 10-12, in 3-4 series, tomentose, at least when young, the outer lanceolate, acutish, half as long as the innermost, the inner elliptic, obtuse, broadly scarious-margined above; ray-flowers 6-8; corollas 2 mm. long; disk-flowers 10-18; corollas 2-2.5 mm. long; achenes 1.5 mm. long, oblong, striate.
Type locality: Northwest America.
Distribution: Southern Washington and Idaho to southern California.
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bibliographic citation
Per Axel Rydberg. 1916. (CARDUALES); CARDUACEAE; TAGETEAE, ANTHEMIDEAE. North American flora. vol 34(3). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
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North American Flora

Artemisia douglasiana

provided by wikipedia EN

Artemisia douglasiana, known as California mugwort, Douglas's sagewort or dream plant, is a western North American species of aromatic herb in the sunflower family.[2]

Distribution

The herbaceous perennial is native to the Western United States in California and areas of Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington; and in northwestern Baja California, Mexico.[3][4][5][6]

The plant prefers direct sunlight and moist soils, but tolerates shady areas and dry soils. It occupies hardiness zones 6a to 10b and occurs at elevations ranging from 0–3080 meters.[7] A. douglasiana is often found in ditches and streambanks.

Description

Artemisia douglasiana is dicot, and a perennial forb. Its stems grow from a substantial colony of rhizomes which require a minimum soil depth of 16 cm and can grow in fine to coarse soils.[7] The stems grow erect and range in height from 0.5–2.5 metres (1.6–8.2 ft).[8]

Its grey-green leaves are evenly spaced, elliptical, and lobed at the tips.[8] The appearance of the 3–5 lobes at the tips of its leaves may range from being seemingly absent to being highly defined. Its leaves have been shown to contain thujone and cineole.[9][10]

During its bloom period, which ranges from May to October, the plant features bell-shaped clusters of flowers containing 5–9 pistillate flowers and 6–25 disk flowers.[8]

Although A. douglasiana can reproduce from seed, it is primarily propagated from division and spreading of its underground rhizomes.[2] The extensive rhizomes help prevent erosion by stabilizing streambanks. A. douglasiana is susceptible to infection by Xylella fastidiosa which causes Pierce's disease.[7]

Uses

Its seeds are foraged by a variety of native birds and its leaves are used as nesting material by some native bees.[7][11]

Artemisia douglasiana is used by Native American tribes as a medicinal plant to relieve joint pain and headaches, and to treat abrasions and rashes (including poison ivy). It is also used to treat women's reproductive issues, including irregular menstruation and is occasionally used as an abortifacient.[12][13]

This plant also has ceremonial and spiritual purposes for many tribes. It is commonly carried to ward off spirits of the dead and was smoked or drunk as a tea to induce vivid dreams.[9][14][15]

It is also planted by contemporary herbalists for both medicinal and spiritual uses.[16]

Cultivation

Artemisia douglasiana is cultivated as an ornamental plant by specialty native plant nurseries, for planting in wildlife gardens, natural landscaping design, and habitat restoration and erosion control projects.[11][17]

References

  1. ^ The Plant List Artemisia douglasiana Besser ex Besser
  2. ^ a b Flora of North America Vol. 19, 20 and 21 Page 524 Northwest mugwort, Douglas sagewort Artemisia douglasiana Besser in W. J. Hooker, Fl. Bor.-Amer. 1: 323. 1833.
  3. ^ Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map
  4. ^ Turner, B. L. 1996. The Comps of Mexico: A systematic account of the family Asteraceae, vol. 6. Tageteae and Athemideae. Phytologia Memoirs 10: i–ii, 1–22, 43–93.
  5. ^ CalFlora taxon report, University of California: Artemisia douglasiana (California Mugwort, Douglas' sagewort, Mugwort)
  6. ^ San Francisco State University, Biogeography of Mugwort by Laurel Poeton
  7. ^ a b c d "A. douglasiana: Plant Characteristics and Associations". Calflora. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  8. ^ a b c "A. douglasiana". Jepson eFlora. UC Berkeley. 2013. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  9. ^ a b "Information About California Mugwort". Indigenous Knowledge Project. Archived from the original on 2013-04-20.
  10. ^ Somaweera, H; Lai, G. C.; Blackeye, R; Littlejohn, B; Kirksey, J; Aguirre, R. M.; Lapena, V; Pasqua, A; Hintz, M. M. (2013). "Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells". Journal of Herbal Medicine. 3 (2): 47–51. doi:10.1016/j.hermed.2013.01.001. PMC 3780460. PMID 24073389.
  11. ^ a b NPIN−Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center: Artemisia douglasiana (Douglas mugwort, Douglas' sagewort)
  12. ^ University of Michigan at Dearborn: Native American Ethnobotany of Artemisia douglasiana
  13. ^ UC Irvine: Local natural history & ethnobotany of Artemisia douglasiana (California Mugwort)
  14. ^ "Native American Uses of California Plants: Ethnobotany" (PDF). University of California, Santa Cruz Arboretum.
  15. ^ Hunn, Eugene S. (1990). Nch'i-Wana, "The Big River": Mid-Columbia Indians and Their Land. University of Washington Press. p. 352. ISBN 0-295-97119-3.
  16. ^ Alternative Nature’s Online Herbal: Mugwort
  17. ^ Las Pilitas Horticulture Database: Artemisia douglasiana (California mugwort)

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Artemisia douglasiana: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Artemisia douglasiana, known as California mugwort, Douglas's sagewort or dream plant, is a western North American species of aromatic herb in the sunflower family.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN