dcsimg

Didymosphenia geminata

provided by EOL authors
First described from northern Europe, this pennate diatom is also known as 'rock snot' (and 'didymo'). It is an invasive species within America, creating thick layers on the bottoms of lakes and slow moving streams, inhibiting effective oxygen supplies, and leading to the distress and death in the benthos.
license
cc-by-3.0
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Didymosphenia geminata

provided by wikipedia EN

Didymosphenia geminata, commonly known as didymo or rock snot, is a species of diatom that produces nuisance growths in freshwater rivers and streams with consistently cold water temperatures and low nutrient levels.[1] It is native to the northern hemisphere, and considered an invasive species in Australia, Argentina,[2] New Zealand,[3] and Chile.[4] Even within its native range, it has taken on invasive characteristics since the 1980s.[1] It is not considered a significant human health risk,[5] but it can affect stream habitats and sources of food for fish and make recreational activities unpleasant. This microscopic alga can be spread in a single drop of water.[1]

Description

 src=
Scanning electron micrograph of the silica cell wall of D. geminata. Scale bar is 50 μm. Image by Sarah Spaulding, USGS.[6]

Didymosphenia geminata is a diatom, which is a type of single-celled organism unique for their silica (SiO2) cell walls. The life history of diatoms includes both vegetative and sexual reproduction, though the sexual stage is not yet documented in this species. Although it is symmetric only along the apical axis, typical of gomphonemoid diatoms, it is a cymbelloid, which are typically symmetric along both primary axes. Cells contain a raphe, which allows them to move on surfaces, and an apical porefield, through which a mucopolysaccharide stalk is secreted.

The stalk can attach to rocks, plants, or other submerged surfaces. When the diatom cell divides, through vegetative reproduction, the stalk divides too, eventually forming a mass of branching stalks. The nuisance build-up is not the cell itself, but their massive production of extracellular stalks. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that form the stalks are made primarily of polysaccharides and protein, forming complex, multi-layered structures that are resistant to degradation.[6]

Native range

The native distribution of D. geminata is the cool temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including the rivers of northern forests and alpine regions of Europe, Asia and parts of North America. Until its recent discovery in New Zealand, where it was introduced, it was never previously found in the Southern Hemisphere.[7] The distribution of didymo in the last two decades appears to be gradually expanding outside its native range. Even within its native range, there have been reports of excessive growths in areas where it previously existed only in low concentrations.

Didymo is now considered likely to be native to New York.[8]

Current distribution

Russian Federation

Buryatia Widespread across large areas of Russia. Occurrence, ecology, water quality, and scanning electron micrography of D. geminata from Irokinda Mine Site, Buryatia, John G. Aronson, North American Diatom Symposium, Sept, 2011.

North America

Canada

 src=
Distribution map - Confirmed presence of Didymosphenia geminata in the United States and Canada. Source: EPA 2007[9]

Alberta: Earliest anecdotal reports of D. geminata blooms in Alberta rivers occurred as early as the mid-1990s (e.g. the upper Bow River in Banff National Park). Reports of Didymo presence and bloom formation have been documented for most rivers in the South Saskatchewan River Basin in recent years (2005 to present).

British Columbia: D. geminata was first reported as a nuisance species in the late 1980s on Vancouver Island. Since that time, outbreaks of Didymo have been reported on the island and on the mainland.[10]

Quebec: D. geminata was first officially reported in 2006[11] but a recent report demonstrates that it was present in the sediments back in the 70s at the least.[12]

New-Brunswick: D. geminata was first reported in 2007.

Ontario: D. geminata was reported in the upper St. Marys River in 2015 and 2016.[13][14]

United States

Arkansas: In late spring / early summer of 2005, didymo was found directly below Bull Shoals Dam on the White River. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality has found a 13-mile reach of the river to be affected.[15]

Arizona. Found in Oak Creek just above the Pine Flat Campground in late August 2015

California: Rock snot has been around in Northern California for quite some time, and is commonly found on the North and South Fork of the Yuba River. It can also be found in reservoirs such as Lake Shasta, Bullard's Bar Reservoir, and Scotts Flat Lake.

Colorado: The range of Didymosphenia geminata was extended into Colorado by limnologist John G. Aronson, who collected it in 1976 from upper Fish Creek, near Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

Connecticut: In 2011 anglers reported blooms of didymo in the West Branch of the Farmington River to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.[16]

Idaho: According to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, didymo has been identified along the South Fork of the Boise River for a number of years. Biologists cannot say for sure if it is native to the drainage, or has appeared in the last 10 to 15 years.[17]

Indiana: Found in unnamed creek which feeds into Patoka River; Orange County. (pers. obs: amateur naturalist)

Kentucky: Didymo was found in the Cumberland River below Wolf Creek Dam in the Crocus Creek area 2008. The State of Kentucky has banned felt-soled waders in the river to prevent spread of the organism.[18]

Maryland: In May 2008, didymo was found in the Gunpowder River in Baltimore County.[19] In December 2009, it was found in the Savage River in western Maryland.[20] In May 2012, its presence was confirmed in Big Hunting Creek in Frederick County.[21]

Missouri: There are currently no known infested streams in the state. The nearest infestation is located in the White River, just south of the Missouri-Arkansas border.[22]

New Hampshire: During the summer of 2007, didymo was discovered for the first time in New Hampshire in the Connecticut River near Pittsburg.[23]

New York: Didymo is now considered likely to be native to New York.[24] In August 2007, didymo was found in New York State in a section of the Batten Kill, a Hudson River tributary, in Washington County.[25] It has also been found in Esopus Creek in the Catskills.[26] Black Creek Washington County

North Carolina: A slithery, mucous-like algae known as “rock snot” is the latest in a long line of invasive species haranguing Western North Carolina's famous trout waters. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is advising anglers to use extra caution when cleaning their equipment to prevent the spread of didymo, which was recently found in the Tuckasegee River in Jackson County.[27]

Pennsylvania: Didymo has been confirmed in the Delaware River.[28] In 2012, its presence was confirmed in the Youghiogheny River.[29] In 2013, PA Department of Environmental Protection put out an alert that it has now been discovered in Pine Creek, Lycoming County.[30]

South Dakota: Didymo has been present in Rapid Creek in South Dakota since at least 2005, and is blamed for a significant decline in the brown trout population there. It is also present to lesser extents in other nearby locations.[31]

Tennessee: Didymo was found in the tailwaters of the Norris, Cherokee, Wilbur and South Holston hydroelectric dams in 2005, the first U.S. finding east of the Mississippi River.[32]

Vermont: In June 2007, didymo was discovered in the Connecticut River near Bloomfield, Vermont, its first recorded discovery in the northeastern United States. The sighting was reported by a fishing guide and confirmed by Dr. Sarah Spaulding, a didymo expert from Denver, Colorado.[33]

Virginia: Didymo was identified in western Virginia in the summer of 2006 in the Smith River, the Jackson River, and the Pound River.[34]

 src=
Seneca Creek in eastern West Virginia

West Virginia: In 2008, didymo was found in West Virginia in the Elk River in Webster County near Webster Springs and in Glady Fork and Gandy Creek, both in Randolph County.[35][36] The alga was found in Seneca Creek in Pendleton County in 2009.[37]

South America

Chile: In 2010, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a Chilean laboratory, Centro de Investigacion en Ecosistemas de la Patagonia (CIEP), confirmed the identification of the diatom D. geminata (didymo) as forming extensive blooms in Chilean rivers in Chile's Los Lagos Region (X Región de Los Lagos) in the Andes west of Esquel, a town in the Chubut Province of Argentina, with reports from the Espolon River and the Futaleufú River for a total of more than 56 river kilometers affected.[38][39][40]

New Zealand

D. geminata was discovered in New Zealand in 2004, the first time it was found in the southern hemisphere. To restrict its spread, the whole of New Zealand's South Island was declared a controlled area in December 2005. Extensive publicity was carried out to limit the spread, but it has subsequently been found in an increasing number of rivers there.

Preventing further spread

 src=
Signs posted by Biosecurity NZ to warn of didymo threat in Waiau River.
A red and white sign on a telephone pole seen in closeup from one side. The text that is visible describes rock snot and advises anglers how to control it
Sign on New York's Esopus Creek advising anglers about didymo

The following methods have been recommended to prevent the spread of didymo in New Zealand:

Check: Before leaving the river, remove all obvious clumps of algae and look for hidden clumps. Leave them at the site. If you find clumps later don't wash them down the drain, treat them with the approved methods below, dry them and soak them in bleach for at least 4 hours.

Clean: Soak and scrub all items for at least one minute in either hot (60 °C) water, a 2% solution of household bleach, antiseptic hand cleaner, or dishwashing detergent.

Dry: If cleaning is not practical (e.g. livestock, pets), after the item is completely dry wait an additional 48 hours before contact or use in any other waterway.

New Zealand and the U.S. states of Alaska, Maryland, South Dakota and Vermont have banned anglers from wearing felt-soled boots. Orvis, a leading U.S. manufacturer of fly-fishing equipment, has started selling more rubber-soled boots than felt-soled.[41]

Alternative theory

In the Gaspésie region of Quebec, a paleolimnological study was performed to (i) assess the validity of claims that didymo is in fact an introduced species in Quebec and (ii) explore potential mechanisms underlying the recent proliferation of didymo in the region. It was found that recent invasion or transfer to the Gaspésie region is a highly unlikely explanation for post-2006 didymo blooms. It was demonstrated that that freshwater systems in Gaspésie are responding to recent climate warming. Given didymo’s habitat and environmental preferences, it was proposed that climate-related changes in regional rivers are likely an important factor that favors its proliferation. [42]

Dr. Max Bothwell at Environment Canada claims that phosphorus-poor streams create blooms of the algae. The research paper, "Blooms of benthic diatoms in phosphorus-poor streams" was first published in March 2017.[43][44]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Didymo (Rock Snot)". Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. 2014-05-08. Archived from the original on 2014-05-09. Retrieved 2014-05-09.
  2. ^ "Alga Didymo o Moco de Roca" [Didymo Algae or Rock Snot] (in Spanish). Argentine Naval Prefecture. Retrieved 2015-06-08.
  3. ^ "Didymo". Biosecurity New Zealand. 2012-07-27. Archived from the original on 2010-01-18. Retrieved 2014-05-09.
  4. ^ "Alto al Didymo". Servicio Nacional de Pesca y Acuicultura. Retrieved 2014-05-09.
  5. ^ "FAQs related to Didymo". Biosecurity New Zealand. Archived from the original on 2015-01-14. Retrieved 2014-05-09.
  6. ^ a b Spaulding, S. A.; L. Elwell (2007). "Increase in nuisance blooms and geographic expansion of the freshwater diatom Didymosphenia geminata" (PDF). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2014-05-09.
  7. ^ Biosecurity New Zealand (August 2007). "Is didymo an exotic species?". Biosecurity New Zealand. Archived from the original on 2013-12-03. Retrieved 2013-12-01.
  8. ^ NYS DEC (April 2021). "Didymo (Rock Snot)". New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Archived from the original on 2021-04-26. Retrieved 2021-09-12.
  9. ^ Distribution map - Confirmed presence of D. geminata in the United States and Canada. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  10. ^ Didymo, Aliens Among Us. Archived 2015-10-07 at the Wayback Machine Virtual Exhibit of the Virtual Museum of Canada
  11. ^ Quebec Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment, Wildlife and Parks
  12. ^ Lavery, J.M.; Kurek, J.; Rühland, K.M.; Gillis, C.A.; Pisaric, M.F.J.; Smol, J.P. (2014). "Exploring the environmental context of recent Didymosphenia geminata proliferation in Gaspésie, Quebec, using paleolimnology". Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 71 (4): 616–626. doi:10.1139/cjfas-2013-0442.
  13. ^ "Michigan confirms two new invasive species". State of Michigan. 4 September 2015. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  14. ^ Petroni, Steffanie (11 September 2015). "Got Snot? St. Marys River does!". Northern Hoot. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  15. ^ "An Assessment and Analysis of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities Associated with the Appearance of Didymosphenia geminata in the White River below Bull Shoals Dam. Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality. 2006-02-24. Retrieved on 2013-04-10" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-16. Retrieved 2013-04-11.
  16. ^ DEP Reports Didymo Discovered in the West Branch Farmington River. Retrieved on 2014-01-15.
  17. ^ Didymo presence noted in Boise River
  18. ^ Aquatic Nuisance Plant Found in Cumberland River Tailwater Below Wolf Creek Dam Archived 2010-11-24 at the Wayback Machine. Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife Resources. Retrieved on 2011-04-10.
  19. ^ Invasive Algae Found In Maryland Archived 2008-06-12 at the Wayback Machine. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. 2008-05-08. Retrieved on 2008-09-21.
  20. ^ Didymo found below Savage River Reservoir Archived 2012-09-23 at the Wayback Machine. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. 2009-12-16. Retrieved on 2011-08-16.
  21. ^ Didymo Infests Third Maryland Trout Stream Archived 2013-04-05 at the Wayback Machine. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. 2012-05-07. Retrieved on 2013-04-10.
  22. ^ Don't Spread Didymo Archived 2013-02-13 at the Wayback Machine. Missouri Department of Conservation. 2013. Retrieved on 2013-04-10.
  23. ^ FAQs about Rock Snot in New Hampshire Archived 2009-04-03 at the Wayback Machine. New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Retrieved on 2008-10-13.
  24. ^ Didymo (Rock Snot). New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Retrieved on 2021-09-12.
  25. ^ NYSDEC Announces Didymo Found in Lower Section of Batten Kill. (Press release). New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. 2007-08-07. Retrieved on 2008-10-13.
  26. ^ George, Scott Daniel; Baldigo, Barry Paul (6 July 2015). "Didymosphenia geminata in the Upper Esopus Creek: Current Status, Variability, and Controlling Factors". PLOS ONE. 10 (7): e0130558. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130558. PMC 4493098. PMID 26148184.
  27. ^ [1]. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
  28. ^ Do you know about Didymo? Archived 2012-11-14 at the Wayback Machine. Pennsylvania Boat and Fish Commission. Retrieved on 2012-05-18.
  29. ^ ""Rock snot" invades Youghiogheny River". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. 11 June 2012. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  30. ^ State Agencies Issue Alert to Contain Invasive Species in Lycoming County. Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Retrieved on 2013-07-11.
  31. ^ Game, Fish and Parks news releases for July 14, 2006 Archived June 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks. 2006-07-14. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  32. ^ Schroeder, Owen. Invasive algae 'Didymo' found in Tennessee River Archived 2007-06-23 at the Wayback Machine. Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. 2005-09-01. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  33. ^ ANR Confirms First Northeastern U.S. Infestation of "Didymo" Archived 2013-08-17 at the Wayback Machine. (Press release). Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. 2007-07-06. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  34. ^ Didymo (Invasive Freshwater Algae) in Virginia Archived 2008-09-20 at the Wayback Machine. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Retrieved on 2008-10-13.
  35. ^ West Virginia Wildlife Resources. "Didymo (Rock Snot) Fact Sheet". West Virginia Wildlife Resources. Archived from the original on 30 August 2011. Retrieved 6 September 2011.
  36. ^ Lawrence, Chris. "Invasive Algae Found in Two More Trout Streams". Metro News. Retrieved 6 September 2011.
  37. ^ "Didymo Confirmed in West Virginia Creek". The Outdoor Wire (7 May 2009). The Outdoor Wire. Retrieved 6 September 2011.
  38. ^ Invasive Algae Species Discovered In Chile's Patagonia Region. The Santiago Times. Retrieved on 2010-06-01.
  39. ^ Didymo Identified in Chile.. United States Geological Survey (USGS). Retrieved on 2010-05-17.
  40. ^ Se Identifica Presencia de Alga Invasora Didymo en Rio Futaleufu.. Centro de Investigacion en Ecosistemas de la Patagonia (CIEP). Retrieved on 2010-05-31.
  41. ^ Barringer, Felicity (August 15, 2010). "Fly Fishers Serving as Transports for Noxious Little Invaders". The New York Times. Retrieved August 17, 2010.
  42. ^ "Exploring the environmental context of recent Didymosphenia geminata proliferation in Gaspésie, Quebec, using paleolimnology". NRC Research Press. Retrieved 13 September 2021.
  43. ^ Bothwell, Max L.; Taylor, Brad W. (2017-03-02). "Blooms of benthic diatoms in phosphorus-poor streams". Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 15 (2): 110–111. doi:10.1002/fee.1466.
  44. ^ "VIU Professor Uncovers the Mystery of Rock Snot". Vancouver Island University News (4 January 2017). Vancouver Island University News. Retrieved 9 June 2018.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Didymosphenia geminata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Didymosphenia geminata, commonly known as didymo or rock snot, is a species of diatom that produces nuisance growths in freshwater rivers and streams with consistently cold water temperatures and low nutrient levels. It is native to the northern hemisphere, and considered an invasive species in Australia, Argentina, New Zealand, and Chile. Even within its native range, it has taken on invasive characteristics since the 1980s. It is not considered a significant human health risk, but it can affect stream habitats and sources of food for fish and make recreational activities unpleasant. This microscopic alga can be spread in a single drop of water.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Didymosphenia geminata

provided by wikipedia FR

Didymosphenia geminata, dénommée couramment en anglais : « didymo » ou « rock snot » (morve des rochers), est une espèce de diatomées de la famille des Gomphonemataceae, et qui produit des nuisances en développant des efflorescences algales dans l'eau des rivières et des ruisseaux, dont la température reste froide avec un faible taux de nutriments[2]. C'est une espèce native de l'hémisphère Nord, et qui est considérée comme une espèce envahissante en Australie, en Nouvelle-Zélande[3] et aussi au Chili[4]. Bien que de caractère autochtone, elle a pris un aspect envahissant depuis les années 1980[2]. Elle n'est pas considérée comme un risque significatif pour la santé humaine[5], mais elle peut affecter les ruisseaux qui sont l'habitat et la source de nourriture des poissons et provoquer des réactions déplaisantes. Cette algue microscopique peut se développer dans une seule goutte d'eau[2].

Description

 src=
image au microscope électronique de la membrane siliceuse d'une algue Didymosphenia geminata. La barre d'échelle représente 50 μm. Image de Sarah Spaulding, USGS[6].

Didymosphenia geminata est une espèce de diatomées, qui sont des organismes unicellulaires à parois formées de silicate (SiO2). Le cycle de la vie de cette diatomée comprend à la fois des formes végétatives et des formes reproductives, bien que l'état sexué ne soit pas encore bien documenté actuellement[Quand ?]. Il existe une symétrie seulement le long de l'axe apical , typique des diatomées gomphonémoïdes. Elle présente une forme cymbelloïde, qui est typiquement symétrique le long de ses deux axes primaires. Les cellules contiennent un raphé, qui lui permet de se déplacer sur les surfaces et un pore apical à travers lequel un pédoncule de mucopolysaccharide peut être sécrété.

Le pédoncule peut s'accrocher aux rochers, aux plantes ou toute autre surface immergée. Quand les cellules de la diatomée se divisent, lors de la multiplication végétative, le pédoncule se divise aussi, formant parfois des masses de pseudopodes branchés. La nuisance de ces formations n'est pas liée à la cellule elle-même, mais à leur production massive de pédoncules extracellulaires. Les substances extracellulaires polymériques (EPS), qui forment les pédoncules sont constituées initialement de polysaccharides et de protéines, formant une structure complexe, multi-couches qui résiste à la dégradation naturelle[6].

Extension naturelle

La distribution initiale de D. geminata est formée des régions froides de l'hémisphère nord, comprenant les rivières des forêts du nord et des régions alpines de l'Europe, de l'Asie et une partie de l'Amérique du Nord. Jusqu'à sa découverte récente en Nouvelle-Zélande, où elle a été introduite, elle n'avait jamais auparavant été trouvée dans l'hémisphère sud[7]. La distribution de « didymo » lors des deux dernières décennies apparait comme étant graduellement extensive en dehors de sa zone naturelle. Même dans cette zone d'extension naturelle, il a été rapporté une croissance excessive des aires où elle existait précédemment en faibles concentrations.

Distribution habituelle

Amérique du Nord

Canada

 src=
Carte de sa distribution - Présence confirmée de Didymosphenia geminata aux États-Unis et au Canada[8]

Alberta : La présence rapportée auparavant de façon anecdotique d’efflorescences de D. geminata dans les rivières de l'Alberta survint dès le milieu des années 1990 (sur la partie supérieure du cours de la rivière Bow dans le parc national de Banff). La présence de Didymo et de formations d’efflorescences ont été documentées pour la plupart des rivières du sud du bassin de la Saskatchewan au cours des dernières années (2005 jusqu'à aujourd'hui).[réf. souhaitée]

Colombie-Britannique : D. geminata a été signalé pour la première fois comme espèce nuisible à la fin des années 1980 sur l'île de Vancouver. Depuis cette époque, une extension de didymo a été signalé sur l'île mais aussi sur le continent[9].

Québec : La présence de D. geminata fut rapportée officiellement pour la première fois en 2006[10] mais un rapport récent démontre qu'elle était déjà présente dans les sédiments datant des années 1970 au moins[11].

New-Brunswick : La présence de D. geminata fut rapportée en 2007.

États-Unis

Arkansas : À la fin du printemps et au début de l'été 2005, D. geminata a été retrouvée directement sous le barrage de Bull Shoal sur la White River. Le département de la qualité de l’environnement de l'Arkansas a signalé une atteinte de la rivière sur une longueur de 13 miles[12].

Californie : D. geminata a été retrouvée au nord de la Californie depuis un certain temps et de façon habituelle dans les confluences tant au nord qu'au sud de la rivière Yuba. Elle peut être aussi retrouvée dans les réservoirs comme au lac Shasta, au réservoir de Bullard's Bar et au lac de Scotts Flat.

Connecticut : En 2011 des pêcheurs à la ligne ont rapporté la présence d’efflorescence de D. geminata dans la branche ouest de la rivière Farmington auprès du Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (en)[13].

Idaho : Selon le département de la pêche de l'Idaho, D. geminata a été identifiée le long de la berge sud de la rivière Boise depuis plusieurs années. Les biologistes ne peuvent pas dire de façon sûre si elles sont natives ou si elles sont apparues il y a 10 ou 15 ans[14].

Kentucky : D. geminata a été retrouvée dans la rivière Cumberland en amont du barrage de Wolf Creek dans la zone de Crocus Creek en 2008. L'État du Kentucky a interdit l'utilisation des cuissards pour éviter la dissémination de ces organismes[15].

Maryland : En mai 2008, D. geminata a été retrouvée dans la rivière Gunpowder dans le Comté de Baltimore dans le Maryland[16]. En décembre 2009, elle a été retrouvée dans la rivière Savage River dans l'ouest du Maryland[17]. En mai 2012, la présence a été confirmée dans la Big Hunting Creek dans le comté de Frederick[18].

Missouri : Il n'y a pas de contamination actuellement connue dans les ruisseaux de cet État. La présence la plus proche est située dans la rivière White River dans l'Arkansas, juste au sud du Missouri[19].

New Hampshire : Durant l'été de 2007, D. geminata a été découverte pour la première fois dans le New Hampshire dans le fleuve Connecticut près de Pittsburg[20].

New York : En aout 2007, D. geminata a été découverte pour la première fois dans une section de Batten Kill (en), un affluent de l'Hudson tributaire du comté de Washington[21]. Elle a aussi été découverte dans l’Esopus Creek dans les Catskills.[réf. souhaitée]

Pennsylvanie : la présence de D. geminata a été confirmée dans le fleuve Delaware[22]. En 2012, sa présence a été confirmée dans la rivière Youghiogheny[23]. En 2013, le département de protection environnementale de Pennsylvanie a émis une alerte après la découverte dans la Pine Creek, dans le Lycoming County[24].

Dakota du Sud : D. geminata est présente dans les rapides de Rapid Creek depuis au moins 2005, et est suspectée d'être responsable du déclin significatif des populations de truites brunes. Elle est aussi présente de façon moins étendue dans d'autres rivières[25].

Tennessee : D. geminata a été retrouvée dans les eaux des barrages de Norris, Cherokee (en), Wilbur (en) et les installations hydroélectriques de South Holston (en) en 2005. C'était la première découverte aux États-Unis à l'est du Mississippi[26].

Vermont : En juin 2007, D. geminata a été découverte dans la rivière Connecticut près de Bloomfield (en). C'est le premier enregistrement de la découverte de sa présence dans un État du nord des États-Unis. Le premier signalement fut rapporté par un guide de pêche et confirmé par le Dr Sarah Spaulding, un expert des didymos de Denver[27].

Virginie : D. geminata a été identifiée dans l'ouest de la Virginie pendant l'été de 2006 dans les rivières Smith (en), Jackson, et Pound (en)[28].

 src=
crique Seneca Creek dans l'extrémité Est de l'Ouest de la Virginie

Virginie-Occidentale : En 2008, didymo fut retrouvée dans la rivière Elk (en) dans le comté de Webster près de Webster Springs, dans la Glady Fork et la Gandy Creek, toutes deux dans le comté de Randolph[29],[30]. L'algue a été découverte dans la Seneca Creek (en) dans le comté de Pendleton in 2009[31].

En Amérique du Sud

Chili: En 2010, le Institut d'études géologiques des États-Unis (USGS) et le laboratoire chilien, Centre d'investigation des écosystèmes de la Patagonie (CIEP), confirmèrent l'identification de la diatomée D. geminata (didymo) formant des efflorescences extensives dans les rivières chiliennes de la région de Los Lagos dans les Andes à l'ouest de Esquel, une ville de la province de Chubut en Argentine, avec des rapports provenant de la rivière Espolon et Futaleufu soit un total de plus de 56 km de rivière affectée[32],[33],[34].

Nouvelle-Zélande

D. geminata fut découverte en Nouvelle-Zélande en 2004, pour la première fois dans l'hémisphère sud. Pour limiter sa diffusion, la totalité de l'Île du Sud a été déclarée zone sous contrôle en décembre 2005. Une information extensive fut menée pour limiter la diffusion mais un nombre croissant de rivières ont été découvertes comme étant infectées.

Références

  1. Guiry, M.D. & Guiry, G.M. AlgaeBase. World-wide electronic publication, National University of Ireland, Galway. https://www.algaebase.org, consulté le 1 mars 2015
  2. a b et c « Didymo (Rock Snot) », Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, 8 mai 2014 (consulté le 9 mai 2014)
  3. « Didymo », Biosecurity New Zealand, 27 juillet 2012 (consulté le 9 mai 2014)
  4. « Alto al Didymo », Servicio Nacional de Pesca y Acuicultura (consulté le 9 mai 2014)
  5. « FAQs related to Didymo », Biosecurity New Zealand (consulté le 9 mai 2014)
  6. a et b S. A. Spaulding et L. Elwell, « Increase in nuisance blooms and geographic expansion of the freshwater diatom Didymosphenia geminata » [PDF], United States Geological Survey, 2007 (consulté le 9 mai 2014)
  7. (en) Biosecurity New Zealand, « Is didymo an exotic species? », Biosecurity New Zealand, août 2007 (consulté le 1er décembre 2013)
  8. Distribution map - Confirmed presence of D. geminata in the United States and Canada. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  9. Didymo, Aliens Among Us. Exposition virtuelle du Musée virtuel du Canada
  10. Quebec Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment, Wildlife and Parks
  11. [1] Lavery JM, Kurek J, Rühland KM, Gillis CA, Pisaric MFJ, Smol JP (2014) Exploring the environmental context of recent Didymosphenia geminata proliferation in Gaspésie, Quebec, using paleolimnology. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
  12. An Assessment and Analysis of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities Associated with the Appearance of Didymosphenia geminata in the White River below Bull Shoals Dam. Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality. 2006-02-24. Retrieved on 2013-04-10.
  13. DEP Reports Didymo Discovered in the West Branch Farmington River. Retrieved on 2014-01-15.
  14. Didymo presence noted in Boise River
  15. Aquatic Nuisance Plant Found in Cumberland River Tailwater Below Wolf Creek Dam. Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife Resources. Retrieved on 2011-04-10.
  16. Invasive Algae Found In Maryland. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. 2008-05-08. Retrieved on 2008-09-21.
  17. Didymo found below Savage River Reservoir. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. 2009-12-16. Retrieved on 2011-08-16.
  18. Didymo Infests Third Maryland Trout Stream. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. 2012-05-07. Retrieved on 2013-04-10.
  19. Don't Spread Didymo. Missouri Department of Conservation. 2013. Retrieved on 2013-04-10.
  20. FAQs about Rock Snot in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Retrieved on 2008-10-13.
  21. NYSDEC Announces Didymo Found in Lower Section of Batten Kill. (Press release). New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. 2007-08-07. Retrieved on 2008-10-13.
  22. Do you know about Didymo?. Pennsylvania Boat and Fish Commission. Retrieved on 2012-05-18.
  23. (en) « "Rock snot" invades Youghiogheny River. », Pittsburgh Tribune-Review,‎ 11 juin 2012 (lire en ligne, consulté le 12 juin 2012)
  24. State Agencies Issue Alert to Contain Invasive Species in Lycoming County. Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Retrieved on 2013-07-11.
  25. Game, Fish and Parks news releases for July 14, 2006 South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks. 2006-07-14. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  26. Schroeder, Owen. Invasive algae 'Didymo' found in Tennessee River. Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. 2005-09-01. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  27. ANR Confirms First Northeastern U.S. Infestation of "Didymo". (Press release). Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. 2007-07-06. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  28. Didymo (Invasive Freshwater Algae) in Virginia. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Retrieved on 2008-10-13.
  29. West Virginia Wildlife Resources, « Didymo (Rock Snot) Fact Sheet », West Virginia Wildlife Resources (consulté le 6 septembre 2011)
  30. Chris Lawrence, « Invasive Algae Found in Two More Trout Streams », Metro News (consulté le 6 septembre 2011)
  31. « Didymo Confirmed in West Virginia Creek », The Outdoor WIre (7 May 2009), The Outdoor WIre (consulté le 6 septembre 2011)
  32. Invasive Algae Species Discovered In Chile’s Patagonia Region. The Santiago Times. Retrieved on 2010-06-01.
  33. Didymo Identified in Chile.. Institut d'études géologiques des États-Unis (USGS). Consulté le 17 mai 2010.
  34. « Se Identifica Presencia de Alga Invasora Didymo en Rio Futaleufu. » (consulté le 22 février 2015). Centro de Investigacion en Ecosistemas de la Patagonia (CIEP). Retrieved on 2010-05-31.
  • (en) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en anglais intitulé .

Références taxinomiques

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Didymosphenia geminata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Didymosphenia geminata, dénommée couramment en anglais : « didymo » ou « rock snot » (morve des rochers), est une espèce de diatomées de la famille des Gomphonemataceae, et qui produit des nuisances en développant des efflorescences algales dans l'eau des rivières et des ruisseaux, dont la température reste froide avec un faible taux de nutriments. C'est une espèce native de l'hémisphère Nord, et qui est considérée comme une espèce envahissante en Australie, en Nouvelle-Zélande et aussi au Chili. Bien que de caractère autochtone, elle a pris un aspect envahissant depuis les années 1980. Elle n'est pas considérée comme un risque significatif pour la santé humaine, mais elle peut affecter les ruisseaux qui sont l'habitat et la source de nourriture des poissons et provoquer des réactions déplaisantes. Cette algue microscopique peut se développer dans une seule goutte d'eau.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR