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Brief Summary

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Spotted rockrose usually blossoms in early spring, having germinated in the autumn and survived the winter as a rosette of leaves. Wet summers can cause a summer blossom. However, if you want to see this plant flower, you'll have to get up early. Each flower blossoms only once and just for a few hours. It opens in the morning during warm sunny weather and the petals fall off before midday. Spotted rockrose grows in sunny places with low open growth and calcium-poor, weakly acidic soil. In the Netherlands, it used to grow in the dunes from Callantsoog northwards but is momentarily only found on Vlieland. Vlieland is also where the plant was first discovered in this country. Why spotted rockrose has become so rare is unclear. Some plant experts think it is due to a change in acidity and nutrients in the top soil and a disturbance in its relationship with fungi.
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Tuberaria guttata

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Tuberaria guttata, the spotted rock-rose or annual rock-rose, is an annual plant of the Mediterranean region which also occurs very locally in Wales and Ireland. The flowers are very variable with the characteristic spot at the base of the petal very variable in size and intensity of colour.

Description

Tuberaria guttata is an annual plant that grows to 2–30 centimetres (1–12 in) tall.[3] It has a rosette of basal leaves, each up to 3 cm (1.2 in) long and 1.5 cm (0.6 in) wide, but this rosette has normally withered by the time the plant is in flower. The stems bear 2–5 opposite pairs of leaves, and a few smaller leaves higher up, arranged alternately.[3]

The inflorescence comprises around 12 flowers, 8–12 mm (0.31–0.47 in) in diameter. Each flower has five uneven sepals and five yellow petals usually with a dark red spot near the base.[3] The flowers are cleistogamous,[4] producing little pollen and no nectar, and attracting few insect visitors,[5] and the petals fall off after only a few hours.[3] The centre of the flower houses around 20 stamens and a single capitate stigma.[3]

The fruit of T. guttata is a capsule containing many seeds, each 0.6 millimetres (0.024 in) long.[3]

Distribution and ecology

Tuberaria guttata is widely distributed in the Mediterranean region, and has a continuous distribution along the French Atlantic coast as far as the Channel Islands.[2] Further north, its distribution is very patchy, being confined to a few localities on the west coasts of Ireland and Wales.[2] The best-known of these populations is on the slopes of Holyhead Mountain in Anglesey.[2] These British populations mark the northernmost limit of the species' distribution.[2] Tuberaria guttata was chosen by Plantlife as the county flower of Anglesey in 2002.[6]

In California, T. guttata has become naturalised in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada on the eastern edge of the Sacramento Valley.[4]

In the Mediterranean region, T. guttata is common in arid habitats from woodlands to grasslands and roadsides.[5] In the British Isles, it grows "in bare patches of thin, dry soil overlying hard igneous rock in open areas within wind-cut heath near the sea".[7]

Taxonomy

Tuberaria guttata was first described by Carl Linnaeus as "Cistus guttatus" in his 1753 work Species Plantarum. It was transferred to the genus Tuberaria by Jules Pierre Fourreau in 1868.

The Welsh populations were described as a separate species in 1844 by Jules Émile Planchon. He named the plants "Helianthemum breweri", after Samuel Brewer, who had discovered the population in 1726.[2] This is now considered a synonym of T. guttata.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Tuberaria guttata (L.) Fourr". The Plant List. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g M. C. F. Proctor. "The British forms of Tuberaria guttata (L.) Fourreau" (PDF). Watsonia. 5 (4): 236–250.
  3. ^ a b c d e f M. C. F. Proctor (1960). "Tuberaria guttata (L.) Fourreau". Journal of Ecology. 48 (1): 243–253. doi:10.2307/2257323. JSTOR 2257323.
  4. ^ a b "T. guttata (L.) Fourr". Jepson Herbarium, University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  5. ^ a b Javier Herrera (2004). "Lifetime fecundity and floral variation in Tuberaria guttata (Cistaceae), a Mediterranean annual". Plant Ecology. 172 (2): 219–225. doi:10.1023/B:VEGE.0000026340.53858.44. S2CID 22458599.
  6. ^ "Spotted rock-rose, (Tuberaria guttata)". Plantlife. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  7. ^ "Tuberaria guttata (Spotted Rock-rose)". Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora. Biological Records Centre. Retrieved 17 April 2015.

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Tuberaria guttata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Tuberaria guttata, the spotted rock-rose or annual rock-rose, is an annual plant of the Mediterranean region which also occurs very locally in Wales and Ireland. The flowers are very variable with the characteristic spot at the base of the petal very variable in size and intensity of colour.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN