dcsimg

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Ceriomyces subglabripes (Peck) Murrill,
Mycologia 1 : 153. 1909.
Boletus subglabripes Peck, Bull. N. Y. State Mus. 8 : 112. 1889.
Boletus flavipes Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 39 : 42. 1886. Not B.fiavipes Berk. 1854.
Boletus rugosiceps Peck, Bull. N. Y. State Mus. 94: 20. 1905. (Type from Long Island.)
Pileus circular, rather thin, subconic or convex to nearly plane, occasionally cespitose, 3-10 cm. broad ; surface glabrous, subviscid when moist, rugose at times, usually so when dry, reddish, pale-chestnut, grayish-brown, golden-brown, or rarely darker-brown ; margin regular, concolorous : context white or whitish, unchangeable, of mild flavor ; tubes plane or convex, adnate or depressed, lemon-yellow, becoming greenish-yellow, or darker from the maturing spores, mouths circular to angular, regular, rather small, edges entire : spores oblong-fusiform, greenish-brown when fresh, soon changing to ochraceous-brown, 12-15 X 4-5 II : stipe central, cylindric, equal or slightly tapering upward, light-yellow without and within, sometimes tinged with red near the middle or lower down, striate but not reticulate, ornamented with small, pallid, scurfy particles, which sometimes partially disappear with age, 5-7 cm. long, 8-15 mm. thick.
Type locality : Caroga, New York. Habitat : Woods.
Distribution : Nova Scotia, Maine, Connecticut, New York, and Missouri.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
William Alphonso MurrilI, Gertrude Simmons BurIingham, Leigh H Pennington, John Hendly Barnhart. 1907-1916. (AGARICALES); POLYPORACEAE-AGARICACEAE. North American flora. vol 9. New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
original
visit source
partner site
North American Flora

Hemileccinum subglabripes

provided by wikipedia EN

Hemileccinum subglabripes is a fungus of the family Boletaceae native to North America. It was first described by Charles Horton Peck in 1887 as Boletus subglabripes.[2] In 2015 it was transferred to Hemileccinum based on DNA evidence.[3]

The species is edible but softens quickly.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Boletus subglabripes Peck, Annual Report on the New York State Museum of Natural History, 39: 42, 1887". MycoBank. International Mycological Association. Retrieved 2013-05-25.
  2. ^ Peck CH. (1886). "Report of the Botanist (1885)". Annual Report on the New York State Museum of Natural History. 39: 30–73 (see p. 42).
  3. ^ Halling RE, Fechner N, Nuhn M, Osmundson T, Soytong K, Arora D, Binder M, Hibbett D (2015). "Evolutionary relationships of Heimioporus and Boletellus (Boletales), with an emphasis on Australian taxa including new species and new combinations in Aureoboletus, Hemileccinum and Xerocomus". Australian Systematic Botany. 28 (1): 1–22. doi:10.1071/SB14049. S2CID 82844711.
  4. ^ Phillips, Roger (2010). Mushrooms and Other Fungi of North America. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books. p. 263. ISBN 978-1-55407-651-2.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Hemileccinum subglabripes: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Hemileccinum subglabripes is a fungus of the family Boletaceae native to North America. It was first described by Charles Horton Peck in 1887 as Boletus subglabripes. In 2015 it was transferred to Hemileccinum based on DNA evidence.

The species is edible but softens quickly.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN