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Diagnostic Description

provided by Fishbase
Diagnosis: body elongate, moderately deep and compressed; dorsal profile of head almost straight, ending in a pointed snout; eyes relatively small; upper jaw slender and rounded posteriorly, ending below or beyond posterior eye margin; 2 dorsal fins, 1st with 7 spines with only their bases connected by a membrane, 2nd with 1 spine and 19-21 soft rays; anal fin with 2 detached spines followed by 1 spine and 17-21 soft rays; pectoral fins short, comprised 1.5-1.8 times in head length; scales small, those on breast oval to strongly lanceolate, and partially embedded in the skin; lateral line very irregular and wavy, describing a convex curve over, and a concave curve behind pectoral fins; no lateral-line scutes (Ref. 57392). Brown above, silvery white below lateral line; lobes of dorsal and anal fins black distally; juveniles (to at least 12 cm fork length) with brownish black bars on sides (Ref. 3197, 57392).
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Recorder
Cristina V. Garilao
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Migration

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Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Susan M. Luna
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Morphology

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Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19 - 21; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 17 - 21
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Cristina V. Garilao
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Trophic Strategy

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Occassionally entering lower reaches of Kunene and Orange Rivers (Ref. 52863). Found in coastal waters including estuaries. Feeds mainly on fish; juveniles prefer crustaceans (Ref. 4332).
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Recorder
Pascualita Sa-a
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Biology

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Marine, coastal pelagic species (Ref. 57392). Adults are found in coastal waters including estuaries. Occasionally entering lower reaches of rivers like the Kunene and Orange Rivers in Namibia (Ref. 52863). Juveniles often entering estuaries (Ref. 57392). Feed mainly on fish; juveniles prefer crustaceans (Ref. 4332). Eggs are pelagic (Ref. 4233). Popular game fish (Ref. 3197).
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Susan M. Luna
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Importance

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fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes
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Susan M. Luna
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Leerfish

provided by wikipedia EN

The leerfish or garrick (Lichia amia) is a species of marine fish in the family Carangidae, and is native to the Mediterranean and the coastal waters of western Africa to the coastal waters of eastern South Africa.[2][3] Also recorded in the Black Sea.[4] These fish can reach 1.5 m in length and more than 30 kg in weight. They inhabit the coastal wave zone where they form small shoals to hunt other smaller fish, favouring mullets.

References

  1. ^ de Morais, L.; Smith-Vaniz, W.F.; Sagna, A.; et al. (2015). "Lichia amia". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2015: e.T198642A43159295. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-4.RLTS.T198642A43159295.en.
  2. ^ a b Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2019). "Lichia amia" in FishBase. August 2019 version.
  3. ^ Van Der Elst, R. (1993). A Guide to the Common Sea Fishes of Southern Africa. Struik Publishers. ISBN 1-86825-394-5.
  4. ^ Black Sea Fishes Check List Archived 2011-01-25 at the Wayback Machine
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Leerfish: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The leerfish or garrick (Lichia amia) is a species of marine fish in the family Carangidae, and is native to the Mediterranean and the coastal waters of western Africa to the coastal waters of eastern South Africa. Also recorded in the Black Sea. These fish can reach 1.5 m in length and more than 30 kg in weight. They inhabit the coastal wave zone where they form small shoals to hunt other smaller fish, favouring mullets.

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Found in coastal waters including estuaries. Feeds primarily on fish; juveniles on crustaceans (Ref. 4332).
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bibliographic citation
Froese, R. & D. Pauly (Editors). (2021). FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (02/2021).
contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]