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Diagnostic Description

provided by FAO species catalogs
Body elongate, depth more than 4 times in SL. Head large, snout blunt.

Jaw teeth strong, canine-like teeth in front, conical and rounded teeth behind. Teeth on vomer large, rather pointed, reaching back as far as the line of palatine teeth on either side of them.

Caudal fin with 20 to 23 soft rays.

Colour body yellowish or greyish-brown to dark brown, with numerous distinct spots extending also onto dorsal fin. Wide black bars in juveniles to about 10 cm.

Size

provided by FAO species catalogs
Maximum: 180 cm. Common: usually to about 120 cm.

Brief Summary

provided by FAO species catalogs
At 25 to 590 m depth, but most common at 100 to 400 m.Benthic, offshore waters over soft bottoms (sandy mud and mud), often with boulders.Feed mainly echinoderms, but also crustaceans, molluscs and fishes. Reproduction in April to December (mainly June-August), eggs deposited in spherical lumps at about 110 to 250 m. The larvae pelagic in June (at 2.4 cm), becoming bottom-living at 4 to 7 cm.

Benefits

provided by FAO species catalogs
Marketed fresh or as frozen fillets. Leather can be made of the skin.

Diagnostic Description

provided by Fishbase
Coloration greyish brown with many distinct spots on body and dorsal fin (Ref. 35388).
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Arlene G. Sampang-Reyes
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Life Cycle

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Spawning happens between the months of September and January at 250 m depth. Females lay great egg bunches in nests built on the ground. The size of the eggs increases with the size of the female. Egg size 5-6 mm, larval length at hatching 21-24 mm.
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Rainer Froese
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Migration

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Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Trophic Strategy

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Inhabits offshore waters over soft bottoms, often with boulders, from 25-590 m, but most common from 100-400 m (Ref. 4694). Benthic (Ref. 58426). Feeds mainly on echinoderms, but also crustaceans, mollusks, fishes (Ref. 4694) and worms (Ref. 58426). In Barents sea, it reached at least 80 cm, age 9 years. Preyed upon by cod, pollock, and Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus). Parasites of the species include 1 myxosporidian, 1 cestode, 7 trematodes, 1 hirudinean, 1 crustacean and 1 protozoan, Trypanosoma murmanensis (Ref. 5951).
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Pascualita Sa-a
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Biology

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Inhabits offshore waters over soft bottoms, often with boulders, from 25-590 m, but most common from 100-400 m (Ref. 4694). Benthic (Ref. 58426). Feeds mainly on echinoderms, but also crustaceans, mollusks, fishes (Ref. 4694) and worms (Ref. 58426). In Barents sea, it reached at least 80 cm, age 9 years. Marketed fresh or as frozen fillets. Leather can be made of the skin (Ref. 35388).
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Importance

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fisheries: minor commercial; gamefish: yes; price category: low; price reliability: reliable: based on ex-vessel price for this species
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Anarhichas minor

provided by wikipedia EN

Anarhichas minor, the spotted wolffish or leopardfish, is a large marine fish of the family Anarhichadidae. This bottom-dwelling species is found across the North Atlantic and adjacent parts of the Arctic Ocean from north of Russia and the Scandinavian Peninsula to the Scotian Shelf, off Nova Scotia, Canada. In Canada the population declined by about 90% from the late 1970s through the early 1990s, particularly in the northern part of its range. In Canada it is classified as a threatened species.

General description

They have prominent canine-like teeth in the front of both jaws; a heavy head with a blunt, rounded snout; small eyes; a long, stout body with no pelvic fins; a long dorsal fin extending to the base of caudal; flexible spiny rays; a small, slightly rounded caudal fin; rounded pectoral fins; firm musculature; colours variable from pale olive to deep brown with upper parts sprinkled with irregularly shaped blackish-brown spots; maximum length to over 1.8 m (5.9 ft) and weight to 23 kg (51 lb).[1]

Similar species

The spotted wolffish can be distinguished from the northern (A. denticulatus) and Atlantic wolffish (A. lupus) by its dark spots.

Distribution

Spotted wolffish occur in the Arctic Ocean and on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean from Labrador to the Barents Sea. Its northern limit in Canada is Baffin Bay, although its presence is rare. In the western North Atlantic, it is found off east and west Greenland, on the Labrador Shelf and Grand Banks and less commonly on the Scotian Shelf.

Habitat and life history

This species is found offshore in cold, deep water, usually below 5 °C (41 °F) and between 50–800 m (160–2,620 ft) in depth but as shallow as 25 m (82 ft) in Canadian Arctic populations. They prefer a coarse sand and sand/shell hash bottom with rocky areas nearby for shelter and nest-building. Spawning occurs in summer to late fall/early winter. As many as 54,600 large eggs [up to 6 mm (0.24 in) in diameter] are laid in deep water in clusters on the sea floor, and are guarded primarily by males. Growth rate is slower for this species than for the Atlantic and northern wolffish (Barents Sea). Fish become mature at seven years of age or older and can live to 21 years. The species does not form large schools and migrations are local and limited.

Diet

The diet of this fish consists primarily of hard-shelled invertebrates found on the bottom, such as crustaceans and mollusks. Echinoderms, tube worms, seaweeds and fish have also been reported in the gut contents of the spotted wolffish.

Conservation status

This species has been identified as threatened by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). It is listed under the Canadian federal Species at Risk Act and was afforded protection under it as of June 2004.[2] According to the 2001 COSEWIC assessment of this species, it has not been given international protection status. As of 2020, it is not listed or categorized on the IUCN Red List.

Threats

Overfishing and habitat alteration are believed to have played a role in the observed declines in wolffish abundance. In Canadian waters, this species is not targeted by the fishing industry, but bycatch mortality by offshore trawlers and long-liners is considered a threat. In addition, activities that disturb the ocean bottom, such as trawling, may damage spawning habitat.

References

  1. ^ Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Spotted Wolffish: A Species at Risk in the North, Government of Canada, 2005.
  2. ^ Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada
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Anarhichas minor: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Anarhichas minor, the spotted wolffish or leopardfish, is a large marine fish of the family Anarhichadidae. This bottom-dwelling species is found across the North Atlantic and adjacent parts of the Arctic Ocean from north of Russia and the Scandinavian Peninsula to the Scotian Shelf, off Nova Scotia, Canada. In Canada the population declined by about 90% from the late 1970s through the early 1990s, particularly in the northern part of its range. In Canada it is classified as a threatened species.

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Diet

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Feeds on starfishes, tube worms, sea urchins, molluscs, seaweeds and sand eels
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North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Mary Kennedy [email]

Distribution

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Western Greenland to Cape Ann, Massachusetts
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North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Mary Kennedy [email]

Habitat

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Found at depths of 25- 600 m in deep waters over soft bottoms.
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North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Mary Kennedy [email]

Habitat

provided by World Register of Marine Species
benthic
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North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS) North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Mary Kennedy [email]