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Opheliidae or Scalibregmatidae?

provided by EOL authors

Traditionally, Travisia has been included within the family Opheliidae (1) However, there have been multiple studies in which this placement has been contested (1,2) Some researchers have provided evidence that confirms the original placement, whereas several others place the group within Scalibregmatidae (1,2) For example, in the 2006 paper "A Mollecular Phylogeny of Annelids," molecular analysis of Travisia placed the group back into Opheliidae (2) Rousett et al further noted that while their data pointed to Opheliidae monophyly and was conducted with a new set of genetic information, Travisia does resemble Scalibregmatidae morphologically (2) By contrast, the 2010 paper "Molecules reject an opheliid afinity for Travisia (Annelida)," utilized four gene analysis to examine the placement of these grub-like marine worms, and found that Travisia fell under Scalibregmatidae (1)

Further research must be conducted to confirm or deny current Travisia placement within Annelida.

References

  • Paul, Christiane, et al. "Molecules reject an opheliid affinity for Travisia (Annelida)." Systematics and Biodiversity 8.4 (2010): 507-512.
  • Rousset, Vincent, et al. "A molecular phylogeny of annelids." Cladistics 23.1 (2007): 41-63.

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Ariel Therrien
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Opheliidae or Scalibregmatidae?

provided by EOL authors
Traditionally, Travisia has been included within the family Opheliidae (1) However, there have been multiple studies in which this placement has been contested (1,2) Some researchers have provided evidence that confirms the original placement, whereas several others place the group within Scalibregmatidae (1,2) For example, in the 2006 paper "A Mollecular Phylogeny of Annelids," molecular analysis of Travisia placed the group back into Opheliidae (2) Rousett et al further noted that while their data pointed to Opheliidae monophyly and was conducted with a new set of genetic information, Travisia did resemble Scalibregmatidae morphologically (2) By contrast, the 2010 paper "Molecules reject an opheliid afinity for Travisia (Annelida)," utilized four gene analysis to examine the placement of these grub-like marine worms, and found that Travisia fell under Scalibregmatidae (1) Further research must be conducted to confirm or deny current Travisia placement within Annelida.
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cc-by-3.0
copyright
Ariel Therrien
original
visit source
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EOL authors

Classification

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Johnston placed Travisia in Arenicolidae and Grube (1850) moved it to Opheliidae. Morphologically Travisia species seem similar to scalibregmatids, with their rugose epidermis, grub-like appearance and (mostly) lack of ventral groove, except they lack a T-shaped prostomium. Blake & Maciolek (2016) state this is a superficial resemblance. Early molecular work appeared to confirm a scalibregmatid relationship but apparently was based on unreliable sequences. Persson & Pleijel (2005) placed Travisia in Scalibregmatidae. Sequences of Rousset et al (2007) placed Travisia back in the opheliids, but Paul et al (2010) rejected those sequences and used their own sequences (not from the type species) to reconfirm that Travisia have Scalibregmatidae affinity, although they conservatively place it as sister taxon to the Scalibregmatidae sensu stricto. Law et al. (2014:566) placed Travisia molecularly in Scalibregmatidae without qualification.

References

  • Grube, Adolf Eduard. (). Die Familien der Anneliden. Archiv für Naturgeschichte, Berlin. (): -.
  • Paul, Christiane; Halanych, Kenneth M.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Bleidorn, Christoph. . Molecules reject an opheliid affinity for Travisia (Annelida). Systematics and Biodiversity (): -
  • Rousset, V.; Pleijel, F.; Rouse, G. W.; Erséus, C.; Siddall, M. E. (). A molecular phylogeny of annelids. Cladistics. (): -.
  • Law, Chris J.; Dorgan, Kelly M.; Rouse, Greg W. (). Relating divergence in polychaete musculature to different burrowing behaviors: A study using opheliidae (Annelida). Journal of Morphology. ():–.

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WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Grube, Adolf Eduard. (1850). Die Familien der Anneliden. <em>Archiv für Naturgeschichte, Berlin.</em> 16(1): 249-364. Paul, Christiane; Halanych, Kenneth M.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Bleidorn, Christoph. 2010. Molecules reject an opheliid affinity for Travisia (Annelida). Systematics and Biodiversity 8(4): 507 - 512 Rousset, V.; Pleijel, F.; Rouse, G. W.; Erséus, C.; Siddall, M. E. (2007). A molecular phylogeny of annelids. <em>Cladistics.</em> 23(1): 41-63. Law, Chris J.; Dorgan, Kelly M.; Rouse, Greg W. (2014). Relating divergence in polychaete musculature to different burrowing behaviors: A study using opheliidae (Annelida). <em>Journal of Morphology.</em> 275(5):548–571. Johnston, G. (1840). Miscellanea Zoologica British Annelids. <em>Annals and Magazine of Natural History.</em> 1(4): 368-375, plates10. Maciolek, Nancy J.; Blake, James A. (2006). Opheliidae (Polychaeta) collected by the R/V <i>Hero</i> and the USNS <i>Eltanin</i> cruises from the Southern Ocean and South America. <em>Scientia Marina.</em> 70S3: 101-113. Johnston, G. (1840). Miscellanea Zoologica British Annelids. <em>Annals and Magazine of Natural History.</em> 1(4): 368-375, plates10.
contributor
Read, Geoffrey [email]
contributor
Read, Geoffrey [email]

Diagnosis

provided by World Register of Marine Species
From Maciolek & Blake (2006: 108-109): "Body stout, pointed at both ends, fusiform or grub-like, rounded cylindrically, without lateral or ventral grooves, or grooves very reduced. Prostomium small, smooth, rounded, conical or truncate, without eyes or processes; nuchal organs present. First chaetiger anterior to mouth. Parapodia reduced, small and smooth, or entirely absent. Branchiae present or absent; branchiae cirriform or branched, may be annulated; branchiae when present from chaetiger 2 or 3. Interramal lateral sensory organs present, lateral eyes absent. Chaetae simple capillaries, may be hispid. Pygidium small, cylindrical, longitudinally furrowed, with ring of stout unequal papillae or without lobes or papillae. Segments annulated, with posterior segments telescoped or forming folds ending in dorsal lappets dorsal and ventral to parapodial rami, these parapodial lappets low and rounded, large and leaflike, or pointed and triangular."
license
cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Grube, Adolf Eduard. (1850). Die Familien der Anneliden. <em>Archiv für Naturgeschichte, Berlin.</em> 16(1): 249-364. Paul, Christiane; Halanych, Kenneth M.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Bleidorn, Christoph. 2010. Molecules reject an opheliid affinity for Travisia (Annelida). Systematics and Biodiversity 8(4): 507 - 512 Rousset, V.; Pleijel, F.; Rouse, G. W.; Erséus, C.; Siddall, M. E. (2007). A molecular phylogeny of annelids. <em>Cladistics.</em> 23(1): 41-63. Law, Chris J.; Dorgan, Kelly M.; Rouse, Greg W. (2014). Relating divergence in polychaete musculature to different burrowing behaviors: A study using opheliidae (Annelida). <em>Journal of Morphology.</em> 275(5):548–571. Johnston, G. (1840). Miscellanea Zoologica British Annelids. <em>Annals and Magazine of Natural History.</em> 1(4): 368-375, plates10. Maciolek, Nancy J.; Blake, James A. (2006). Opheliidae (Polychaeta) collected by the R/V <i>Hero</i> and the USNS <i>Eltanin</i> cruises from the Southern Ocean and South America. <em>Scientia Marina.</em> 70S3: 101-113. Johnston, G. (1840). Miscellanea Zoologica British Annelids. <em>Annals and Magazine of Natural History.</em> 1(4): 368-375, plates10.
contributor
João Gil [email]
contributor
João Gil [email]