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Cagle's Map Turtle

Graptemys caglei Haynes & Mckown 1974

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

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Maximum longevity: 14.5 years (captivity)
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Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
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de Magalhaes, J. P.
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Biology

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Cagle's map turtle is a diurnal species that spends much of the day basking on logs and rocks in the water. A predominantly aquatic species, this turtle rarely comes onto land other than to nest (8). Hatchlings have been collected from September through November, indicating that the nesting season likely occurs in late spring to early summer (2). As many as three clutches of one to six eggs may be laid by a single female each year, deposited in nest-cavities approximately 15 centimetres deep near the water (2) (8). Sex is temperature-dependent, with lower nest temperatures producing males and higher temperatures producing females (8). Female Cagle's map turtle feed almost exclusively on Asian clams, while the males predominantly consume caddisfly larvae, and occasionally other insects and small molluscs (9). This difference in diet is correlated to the difference in head-width between the sexes (6). Plant remains have also been found in specimen's stomachs, but are thought to have been ingested incidentally (2) (8).
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Conservation

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Cagle's map turtle is listed as Threatened in Texas and is therefore protected within the state (4).
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Description

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Map turtles are so named for the distinctive fine lines covering their skin and upper shell (carapace), which somewhat resemble a road or contour map, and lend an air of beauty and elegance to these species that is hard to equal (3). Like most turtles found in the green-tinted rivers it occupies, Cagle's map turtle is a distinctive greenish colour (4), and arguably one of the most attractive of all map turtles (5). The upper shell is serrated at the back, bears a steep keel of sharp spine-like projections down the centre (2), and is brightly patterned with black and yellow-green concentric lines and circles (5). The head, limbs and tail are black with numerous cream to yellow lines, and there is a cream-coloured bar on the chin and a yellow 'V'-shaped mark on the top of the head (2) (5). Female Cagle's map turtles are larger than males and also have broader heads (6).
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Habitat

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Generally found in shallow limestone and mud-bottomed streams with moderate currents, and in pools up to three metres in depth (2) (8).
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Range

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Restricted to the Guadalupe River and its tributaries, the San Marcos and Blanco Rivers, of south-eastern Texas, U.S. (2) (7).
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Status

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Classified as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List 2007 (1).
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Threats

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Relatively little is documented on the threats that face Cagle's map turtle, other than the fact that its habitat is constantly being threatened by siltation, impoundment and other forms of habitat alteration (10).
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Distribution

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Continent: North-America
Distribution: USA (Guadalupe and San Antonio river drainages in SC Texas)
Type locality: Guadalupe River, 8 km NW Cuero, DeWitt Co, Texas, USA.
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Cagle's map turtle

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Cagle's map turtle (Graptemys caglei) is a species of turtle in the family Emydidae. The species is endemic to Texas. G. caglei is native to the Guadalupe, San Antonio, and San Marcos Rivers in Texas.[3]

Etymology

The specific name, caglei, is in honor of American herpetologist Dr. Fred Ray Cagle (1915-1968).[4]

Description

Cagle's map turtle has intricate patterns on the carapace and plastron, as well as serrated edges on the posterior of the carapace, as is typical of all map turtles. It is smaller than most map turtles, and very sexually dimorphic, with males reaching only 4 in (10 cm) straight carapace length, while females can exceed 7 in (18 cm) in straight carapace length.[3]

References

  1. ^ van Dijk PP (2011). "Graptemys caglei ". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2011: e.T9497A97417639. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2013.RLTS.T9497A12996153.en.{{cite iucn}}: error: |doi= / |page= mismatch (help)|date= / |doi= mismatch
  2. ^ Fritz, Uwe; Havaš, Peter (2007). "Checklist of Chelonians of the World" (PDF). Vertebrate Zoology. 57 (2): 186. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 December 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Cagle's Map Turtle". Graptemys.com. Archived from the original on 11 July 2011. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
  4. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (2011). The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. xiii + 296 pp. ISBN 978-1-4214-0135-5. (Graptemys caglei, p. 46).
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Cagle's map turtle: Brief Summary

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Cagle's map turtle (Graptemys caglei) is a species of turtle in the family Emydidae. The species is endemic to Texas. G. caglei is native to the Guadalupe, San Antonio, and San Marcos Rivers in Texas.

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