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Gyrosmilia

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Gyrosmilia is a monotypic genus of large polyp stony coral. It is represented by a single species, Gyrosmilia interrupta .[2] It was first described by Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg in 1834 as Manicina interrupta.[2]

Description

It is known to have a "distinctive uniform greenish grey-brown" color.[2] Colonies are either submassive humps or laminar in shape with free margins up to 0.5 meters (1.6 feet) wide.[2] Gyrosmilia interrupts has tentacles that extend only at night.[2]

Distribution and habitat

It can be found in scattered pockets throughout eastern African islands and coastline such as Madagascar, Eritrea, the Aldabran atoll, Réunion, Kenya, Mozambique, Mauritius, South Africa, and parts of the Red Sea in uncommon abundance.[2]

It prefers shallow coral reefs that are protected from strong surface wave action.[3]

References

  1. ^ Turak, E., Sheppard, C. & Wood, E. 2008. Gyrosmilia interrupta . The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2016.1.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Gyrosmilia interrupta (Ehrenberg, 1834)". 2013. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  3. ^ Australian Institute of Marine Science. "Gyrosmilia interrupta". Corals of the World. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
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Gyrosmilia: Brief Summary

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Gyrosmilia is a monotypic genus of large polyp stony coral. It is represented by a single species, Gyrosmilia interrupta . It was first described by Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg in 1834 as Manicina interrupta.

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Biology

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bibliographic citation
Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> van der Land, J. (ed). (2008). UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms (URMO).
contributor
Jacob van der Land [email]

Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Colonies are up to 30 cm across. They are encrusting, rarely attaining a height of over 3 cm. Valleys are about 8 mm wide or less, and septa of adjacent valleys often join at the top of the thin wall, where their line of contact is marked by a thin ridge. Septa curve slightly laterally, and have a radius over the top of the wall of 2-3 mm. They plunge steeply, and there is no columella. The species is common at mid- to deep depths on all reef slopes. The species prefers recesses and small holes in the reef, which makes it more inconspicuous although it is fairly abundant. It is found equally commonly in moderately turbid as well as clear water reef slopes. Living corals are always shades of brown. Tentacles are retracted during the day. (Sheppard, 1998 <308>) Colonies are circular and slightly domed, have meandering radiating valleys. The light skeleton has the enlarged septa found in Plerogyra and Physogyra, but lacks their characteristic vesicles. Colour: usually a chocolate brown, occasionally with a greenish hue. Habitat: diverse. (Richmond, 1997)
license
cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em> van der Land, J. (ed). (2008). UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms (URMO).
contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]