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Andrias

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Andrias is a genus of giant salamanders. It includes the largest salamanders in the world, with A. japonicus reaching a length of 1.44 metres (4 ft 9 in), and A. sligoi reaching 1.80 metres (5 ft 11 in). While extant species are only known from East Asia, several extinct species in the genus are known from late Oligocene and Neogene aged fossils collected in Europe and North America, indicating that the genus formerly had a much wider range.[1]

Taxonomy

The generic name derives from Ancient Greek ἀνδριάς, "statue." The former name was Megalobatrachus, from Ancient Greek meaning "giant frog."

Species

Extant

Based on genetic evidence, there may be more extant species in the genus. A study in 2018 found that A. davidianus sensu lato was a species complex that consisted of at least 5 different species.[2] A. sligoi, which was formerly synonymized with A. davidianus, was revived in 2019 for one of these populations.[3]

Extinct

References

  1. ^ "Fossilworks: Andrias". fossilworks.org. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
  2. ^ "5 Giant Salamander Species Identified—And They're All in Danger". National Geographic News. 2018-05-29. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
  3. ^ Turvey, Samuel T.; Marr, Melissa M.; Barnes, Ian; Brace, Selina; Tapley, Benjamin; Murphy, Robert W.; Zhao, Ermi; Cunningham, Andrew A. (2019). "Historical museum collections clarify the evolutionary history of cryptic species radiation in the world's largest amphibians". Ecology and Evolution. 9 (18): 10070–10084. doi:10.1002/ece3.5257. ISSN 2045-7758. PMC 6787787. PMID 31624538.
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Andrias: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Andrias is a genus of giant salamanders. It includes the largest salamanders in the world, with A. japonicus reaching a length of 1.44 metres (4 ft 9 in), and A. sligoi reaching 1.80 metres (5 ft 11 in). While extant species are only known from East Asia, several extinct species in the genus are known from late Oligocene and Neogene aged fossils collected in Europe and North America, indicating that the genus formerly had a much wider range.

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Tritomegas

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Tritomegas is a genus of shield bugs.[1]

Species

References

  1. ^ Kammerschen, D. (1986). "Species-discrimination and geographic distribution in the cydnid genus Tritomegas (Heteroptera, Cydnidae)". In Drospoulos, Sakis (ed.). 2nd International Congress Concerning the Rhynchota Fauna of Balkan and Adjacent Regions Proceedings. Microlimni, Greece: 2nd International Congress Concerning the Rhynchota Fauna of Balkan and Adjacent Regions. pp. 33–34.
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Tritomegas: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Tritomegas is a genus of shield bugs.

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