dcsimg

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Annual or perennial herbs or subshrubs. Stems herbaceous or woody below, sometimes succulent. Inflorescence paniculate, racemose or subspicate, usually terminal. Flowers in whorls, few-flowered cymes or dichasia, occasionally solitary. Bracts small, clearly differentiated from the leaves. Calyx 2-lipped (the upper lip consisting of a large single tooth, the lower lip of 4 lanceolate-triangular or subulate teeth) or subequally 5-toothed. Corolla 2-lipped, tube usually bent and expanded near the base; upper lip usually 4-lobed, shorter than the boat-shaped lower lip. Stamens 4; filaments free or united at base. Stigma shortly 2-lobed. Nutlets smooth.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Plectranthus Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/genus.php?genus_id=1231
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Plectranthus

provided by wikipedia EN

Plectranthus, with some 350 species, is a genus of warm-climate plants occurring largely in the Southern Hemisphere, in sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, India and the Indonesian archipelago down to Australia and some Pacific Islands. They are closely related to Solenostemon and are known as the spurflowers. Several species are grown as ornamental plants, as leaf vegetables, as root vegetables for their edible tubers, or as medicine.[2]

Plectranthus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the engrailed (Ectropis crepuscularia).

Many plants called coleus actually belong to this genus, as Coleus is no longer recognized.

Selected species

Formerly described as Plectranthus

Image gallery

References

  1. ^ a b "Genus: Plectranthus L'Hér". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-10-05. Retrieved 2011-02-17.
  2. ^ Catherine W. Lukhobaa; Monique S.J. Simmonds & Alan J. Paton (3 January 2006). "Plectranthus: A review of ethnobotanical uses". Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 103 (1): 1–24. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2005.09.011. PMID 16289602.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap "Plectranthus". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2009-02-03.
  4. ^ Bussmann R. W.; et al. (2006). "Plant use of the Maasai of Sekenani Valley, Maasai Mara, Kenya". J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2: 22. doi:10.1186/1746-4269-2-22. PMC 1475560. PMID 16674830.
  5. ^ "GRIN Species Records of Plectranthus". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-02-17.

"
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Plectranthus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
" Plectranthus argentatus

Plectranthus, with some 350 species, is a genus of warm-climate plants occurring largely in the Southern Hemisphere, in sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, India and the Indonesian archipelago down to Australia and some Pacific Islands. They are closely related to Solenostemon and are known as the spurflowers. Several species are grown as ornamental plants, as leaf vegetables, as root vegetables for their edible tubers, or as medicine.

Plectranthus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the engrailed (Ectropis crepuscularia).

Many plants called coleus actually belong to this genus, as Coleus is no longer recognized.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN