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Polyneoptera

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The cohort Polyneoptera[1][2] is a proposed taxonomic ranking for the Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, etc.) and all other Neopteran insects believed to be more closely related to Orthoptera than to any other insect orders. These winged insects, now in the Paraneoptera, were formerly grouped as the Hemimetabola or Exopterygota on the grounds that they have no metamorphosis, the wings gradually developing externally throughout the nymphal stages.[3]

Superorders and orders

The Polyneoptera Species File lists the following:[4]

Superorder Dictyoptera

Superorder Orthopterida

Synonyms include: Archaeorthoptera, Gryllidea, Orthopterodea, Orthopterodida, Orthopteroidea, Panorthoptera

Superorder †Perlidea (synonym Plecopteroidea)

Superorder not placed

References

  1. ^ Martynov, AV (1938). "Studies on the geological history and phylogeny of the orders of insects (Pterygota)". Tr. Paleont. Inst. Inst. Akad. Nauk SSSR (in Russian). 7 (4): 70.
  2. ^ Delclos; Nel; Azar; Bechly; Dunlop; Engel; Heads (2008). "The enigmatic Mesozoic insect taxon Chresmodidae (Polyneoptera): New palaeobiological and phylogenetic data, with the description of a new species from the Lower Cretaceous of Brazil". Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen. 247 (3): 353–381. doi:10.1127/0077-7749/2008/0247-0353.
  3. ^ Entomology Endopterygota. Royal Entomological Society. Retrieved 29 September 2020.
  4. ^ Polyneoptera, Species File (Version 5.0/5.0; retrieved 5 September 2020)

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Polyneoptera: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The cohort Polyneoptera is a proposed taxonomic ranking for the Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, etc.) and all other Neopteran insects believed to be more closely related to Orthoptera than to any other insect orders. These winged insects, now in the Paraneoptera, were formerly grouped as the Hemimetabola or Exopterygota on the grounds that they have no metamorphosis, the wings gradually developing externally throughout the nymphal stages.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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