dcsimg

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

provided by AnAge articles
Maximum longevity: 36.8 years (captivity) Observations: One female specimen acquired in 1971 by Lincoln Park Zoo, and estimated to be 3 years of age, passed away in 2005 at an estimated 36.8 years of age (John Gramieri, pers. comm.).
license
cc-by-3.0
copyright
Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
editor
de Magalhaes, J. P.
partner site
AnAge articles

Untitled

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This species of armadillo is easily caught by hand. Its genetic makeup is very different from most armadillos.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

provided by Animal Diversity Web

They do not appear to be declining at a threatening rate.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: near threatened

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

No documented examples.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This species is hunted throughout its range for its meat and is an important food source in some areas.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Trophic Strategy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This species of armadillo eats mainly ants and termites. They use their strong legs and large claws to dig through insect colonies or under bark to get to their food.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Distribution

provided by Animal Diversity Web

South America: north central Argentina, east central Bolivia and sections of Brazil and Paraguay.

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Habitat

provided by Animal Diversity Web

This species is found mainly in the grasslands or marshes near dry forests or savannah areas.

Terrestrial Biomes: savanna or grassland ; scrub forest

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Expectancy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
36 years.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Total body length is around 300mm with a tail length of 64mm. They are dark brown and heavely armored with a thick, leathery shell that is usually segmented into 3 bands. This armor covers the tail, head, feet, and back of the animal. The tail is very stout and immobile. The middle three toes on the back feet are grown together and have a thick claw. The forefeet toes are seperated and have 4 claws.

Range mass: 1.4 to 1.6 kg.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Average basal metabolic rate: 1.172 W.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The southern three-banded armadillo reaches sexual maturity at 9-12 months of age. Most of the young are born from November-January but births have been reported throughout the year, indicating that there is no distinct breeding season. The single young are born blind but quickly develop the ability to close their shells and walk. They are no longer dependent on their mothers after 72 days.

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

Average birth mass: 80 g.

Average gestation period: 120 days.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male)
Sex: male:
320 days.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female)
Sex: female:
320 days.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Ellis, E. 1999. "Tolypeutes matacus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Tolypeutes_matacus.html
author
Eric J. Ellis, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Biology

provided by Arkive
Unlike other armadillo species, the southern three-banded armadillo does not dig burrows, and instead takes refuge in the abandoned burrows of other animals such as anteaters (3) (4). While generally a solitary species, as many as twelve southern three-banded armadillos have been found sharing a burrow during the winter (3). This species has a broad diet, comprising of a variety of invertebrates, particularly beetle larvae, which are taken throughout the year, along with large quantities of ants and termites during the dry season (July to November), and fruits during the summer rains (5). When foraging for ants and termites, this species will probe the ground with its snout, prise off tree bark, or tear into nests with its powerful claws. A remarkably fast mover, when threatened the southern three-banded armadillo escapes by running on its hind-legs, with its foreclaws touching the ground (3). Breeding is believed to occur between October and January (4), with most births in Paraguay occurring between November and January (3). After a gestation period of 120 days, the female gives birth to a single young, which is suckled for a further 10 weeks (2) (4). The southern three-banded armadillo reaches sexual maturity at around 9 to 12 months old, and has been known to live for over 17 years in captivity (3).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Conservation

provided by Arkive
The southern three-banded armadillo is found in a number of protected areas, which provide a refuge from the habitat destruction that is occurring within its range. In addition, a captive population of this species is maintained in North America (1).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Description

provided by Arkive
The southern three banded armadillo is remarkable for being one of the few armadillo species capable of rolling into a ball (2). The armour-plating that covers the body is divided into two domed shells, with three armoured bands in between, joined by flexible bands of skin. These flexures allow the body to bend in the middle, snapping the lower edges of the two body shells together, thereby forming an impregnable ball (2) (3). Other distinctive features of the southern three-banded armadillo are the second, third and fourth toes of the hind feet, which are fused into a hoof-like claw. By contrast, the fore feet have four separate digits each bearing sharp, powerful claws (3)
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Habitat

provided by Arkive
The southern three-banded armadillo is commonly found in the most arid parts of the Gran Chaco (1), but also occurs in areas of grassland and marshland between scattered forests in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil (3).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Range

provided by Arkive
The southern three-banded armadillo is found from eastern Bolivia and south-western Brazil, south through the Gran Chaco region of Paraguay, to the province of Buenos Aires in Argentina. It is known to occur from sea level up to elevations of 770 m (1).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Status

provided by Arkive
Classified as Near Threatened (NT) on the IUCN Red List (1).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Threats

provided by Arkive
Due to the fact that the southern three-banded armadillo does not dig a burrow, it is easier to hunt than other armadillo species, and faces high-levels of hunting pressure across its range (1) (5). This threat is compounded by the conversion of large amounts of its species' habitat to agricultural land. As a result, the southern three-banded armadillo is undergoing a significant decline and may soon warrant threatened status (1).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors

Found in central and eastern Bolivia, the Mato Grasso of central Brazil, the Chaco region of Paraguay, and northern and central Argentina, Three-banded armadillos(Tolypeutes matacus) have a head and body length of 218 to 273 mm (8.6 to 10.7 in), a tail length of 60 to 80 mm (2.4 to 3.1 in) and weigh from 1.00 to 1.59 kg (2.2 to 3.5 lbs).

Three-banded armadillos are blackish brown in color. Most animals have three moveable bands, although some possess only two, and others may have four. Members of the genus Tolypeutes are the only armadillos that can completely enclose themselves in their own shell by rolling into a ball. The large front and rear portions of the shell are not attached to the skin on the sides, providing ample free space to fit the head, legs and tail into the shell when the animals are rolled up.

The 2nd, 3rd and 4th toes of the hind foot are grown together, almost like a hoof. The 1st and 5th toes remain separate. T. matacus has four toes on the fore foot. The claws on the forefeet are very strong. Three-banded armadillos generally walk on the tips of the foreclaws, even when running. The tail is short and thick. The diploid number of chromosomes is 2n=38, the lowest of any armadillo studied to date — most other armadillos have 2n=50 to 64. (Humans have a diploid chromosome number of 2n=46, for comparison.)

T. matacus is found in grassy or marshy areas between scattered forestland. The animal does not appear to dig its own burrows, but instead uses abandoned anteater burrows as shelter.

When threatened, members of the genus Tolypeutes roll up into ball, leaving only a small opening between the shell edges. If the animal is prodded through the opening, it quickly snaps fully shut like a steel trap. Rolling into a ball appears to be an effective defense against natural enemies.

Three-banded armadillos principally eat beetle larvae, although ants and termites are an important portion of the diet during the dry season (July to November). Insects are obtained by burrowing into ground nests or under the bark of rotting trees. The animals also include a significant amount of fruit in their diet during the wet season. Three-banded armadillos may be found at densities of up to 7 animals per square kilometer. They are primarily solitary, although groups of up to 12 have been observed sharing the same den site during cold spells.

One young is born per litter; gestation period is about 120 days. Litters are generally born between November and January. The young are born fully formed, resembling miniature adults, and can walk and roll into a ball immediately from birth. Young are weaned at 72 days, and are sexually mature at 9 — 12 months. Some individuals have lived 20 years or more in captivity. T. matacus is the third most common armadillo held in zoos, and has bred successfully in several zoos in the US. T. matacus is designated as near threatened by the IUCN. Both species of Tolypeutes seem to be suffering due to overhunting.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Armadillo Online!
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Southern three-banded armadillo

provided by wikipedia EN

 src=
Three banded armadillo skeleton rolled in a ball. (Museum of Osteology)

The southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus), also known as La Plata three-banded armadillo or Azara's domed armadillo,[2] is an armadillo species from South America.[3] It is found in parts of southwestern Brazil, northern Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia, at elevations from sea level to 770 m (2,530 ft).[1]

The southern three-banded armadillo and the other member of the genus Tolypeutes, the Brazilian three-banded armadillo, are the only species of armadillos capable of rolling into a complete ball to defend themselves (volvation). The three characteristic bands that cover the back of the animal allow it enough flexibility to fit its tail and head together, allowing it to protect its underbelly, limbs, eyes, nose and ears from predators. The shell covering its body is armored and the outer layer is made out of keratin, the same protein that builds human fingernails. They are typically a yellow or brownish color. They are among the smaller armadillos, with a head-and-body length of about 22 to 27 cm (8.7 to 10.6 in) and a weight between 1 and 1.6 kg (2.2 and 3.5 lb).[4] Unlike most armadillos, they are not fossorial,[1] but will use abandoned giant anteater burrows.[4]

The three-banded armadillo has a long, sticky, straw-like pink tongue that allows it to gather up and eat many different species of insects, typically ants and termites. In captivity, armadillos also eat foods such as fruits and vegetables.

The species is threatened by habitat destruction from conversion of its native Dry Chaco to farmland, and from hunting for food and the pet trade.[1]

Gallery

 src=
Individual in the process of curling up
 src=
Individual rolled up into a defensive ball

References

  1. ^ a b c d Noss, A.; Superina, M.; Abba, A.M. (2014). "Tolypeutes matacus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2014: e.T21974A47443233. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  2. ^ "Southern three-banded armadillo". Xenarthrans.org.
  3. ^ Gardner, A.L. (2005). "Order Cingulata". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 98–99. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  4. ^ a b Armadillo Online: Tolypeutes matacus. Retrieved 14 June 2014.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Southern three-banded armadillo: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
 src= Three banded armadillo skeleton rolled in a ball. (Museum of Osteology)

The southern three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus), also known as La Plata three-banded armadillo or Azara's domed armadillo, is an armadillo species from South America. It is found in parts of southwestern Brazil, northern Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia, at elevations from sea level to 770 m (2,530 ft).

The southern three-banded armadillo and the other member of the genus Tolypeutes, the Brazilian three-banded armadillo, are the only species of armadillos capable of rolling into a complete ball to defend themselves (volvation). The three characteristic bands that cover the back of the animal allow it enough flexibility to fit its tail and head together, allowing it to protect its underbelly, limbs, eyes, nose and ears from predators. The shell covering its body is armored and the outer layer is made out of keratin, the same protein that builds human fingernails. They are typically a yellow or brownish color. They are among the smaller armadillos, with a head-and-body length of about 22 to 27 cm (8.7 to 10.6 in) and a weight between 1 and 1.6 kg (2.2 and 3.5 lb). Unlike most armadillos, they are not fossorial, but will use abandoned giant anteater burrows.

The three-banded armadillo has a long, sticky, straw-like pink tongue that allows it to gather up and eat many different species of insects, typically ants and termites. In captivity, armadillos also eat foods such as fruits and vegetables.

The species is threatened by habitat destruction from conversion of its native Dry Chaco to farmland, and from hunting for food and the pet trade.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN