Overview

Brief Summary

Ctenophores are invertebrate marine animals commonly referred to as "comb jellies" and "sea walnuts." Fewer than 100 species of this phylum have been identified. All ctenophores have fragile, transparent bodies and eight rows of cilia called comb plates that they use to swim. Ctenophores are also characterized by the colloblasts found on the surface of their tentacles. These specialized glue cells secrete a sticky substance that helps ctenophores catch prey.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:94
Specimens with Sequences:86
Specimens with Barcodes:84
Species:9
Species With Barcodes:9
Public Records:6
Public Species:2
Public BINs:2
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Ctenophora (fly)

For the phylum of comb jellyfish, see Ctenophora.

Ctenophora is a genus of true crane flies. The species are large (about 20 mm long, with 25-mm wingspans), shiny black craneflies with large yellow, orange, or red markings to mimic wasps. Males have comb-like antennae. The larvae are saproxylic. The species are confined to old deciduous forests, orchards, and other habitats with continuity of the presence of dying and fallen trees. Ctenophora species are important bioindicators.

Ctenophora is distinguished from related genera (Dictenidia Brulle, Phoroctenia Coquillett) by these characteristic combinations. The segments of the flagellum of the males have two pairs of outgrowths, the lower pair longer than upper pair. The antennae of the female are distinctly 13-segmented, and often indistinctly serrated. The sides of the mesothorax bear long bristles. Sternite 8 of the female is without dentate protuberances.

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