dcsimg

Comments

provided by eFloras
Psidium guajava has become naturalized in disturbed habitats in many tropical parts of the world.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 332 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Description

provided by eFloras
Trees, to 13 m tall. Bark gray, smooth, peeling in strips. Branchlets angular, pubescent. Petiole ca. 5 mm; leaf blade oblong to elliptic, 6-12 × 3.5-6 cm, leathery, abaxially pubescent, adaxially slightly rough, secondary veins 12-15 on each side of midvein and usually impressed, reticulate veins obvious, base rounded, apex acute to obtuse. Flowers solitary or 2 or 3 in cymes. Hypanthium campanulate, ca. 5 mm, pubescent. Calyx cap nearly rounded, 7-8 mm, irregularly opening. Petals white, 1-1.4 cm. Stamens 6-9 mm. Ovary adnate to hypanthium. Style as long as stamens. Berry globose, ovoid, or pyriform, 3-8 cm, with persistent calyx lobes at apex; flesh white or yellow; placenta reddish, well developed, fleshy. Seeds many. Fl. summer.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 332 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Distribution

provided by eFloras
Tropical America, widely planted and naturalised in Tropical Asia.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Elevation Range

provided by eFloras
450-1200 m
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat & Distribution

provided by eFloras
Cultivated and sometimes naturalized in Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Sichuan, Taiwan, and Yunnan [native to tropical America].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 332 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Synonym

provided by eFloras
Guajava pyrifera (Linnaeus) Kuntze; Myrtus guajava (Linnaeus) Kuntze; Psidium pomiferum Linnaeus; P. pyriferum Linnaeus.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 13: 332 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Brief Summary

provided by EOL staff

Guava (Psidium guajava) is a well known cultivated tree because of the paste and jelly made from its fruits. The fruit (which is technically a type of berry) has a thin, yellow, slightly sour edible outer layer; within, there are numerous yellow seeds more than 3 to 5 mm long in a juicy pinkish or yellow pulp. The fruits are unusually rich in vitamin C. The outer layer of the fruit is preserved and canned commercially, as is the juice. (Little and Wadsworth 1964)

Guava is native to tropical America, probably from southern Mexico south to South America, but its range has been dramatically increased via cultivation. It is now cultivated (and escaped and naturalized and often considered an invasive pest) in southern Florida (including the Florida Keys), Bermuda, and throughout the West Indies from the Bahamas and Cuba to Trinidad, and south to Brazil. It is also cultivated and naturalized in much of the Old World tropics and subtropics. (Little and Wadsworth 1964) Guava was first recorded from the Pacific Islands (Hawaii) by the early 1800s (Whistler 1995). It is common in dry to wet disturbed areas such as pastures, waste places, and roadsides, as well as in scrub forest up to 1200 meters elevation, among other habitats.

Guava is a shrubby evergreen tree up to 10 meters in height, with smooth reddish brown bark that is thin and scales off in thin sheets. It has oppositely arranged oblong or elliptic leaves with sunken parallel veins and minute glandular dots. The fragrant white flowers are large, measuring about 4 cm across the 4 or 5 large petals, and bear numerous showy brushlike stamens with slender white filaments averaging about 1.2 cm long. The flowers are mostly borne singly at leaf bases. The edible fruits are yellow and rounded (sometimes pear-shaped), 3 to 10 cm in diameter, with 4 or 5 retained sepals at the apex. (Little and Wadsworth 1964; Whistler 1995)

The related Strawberry Guava (Psidium cattleianum) is another native of tropical America that has spread widely in the tropics, including the Pacific Islands (where it was first recorded, in Hawaii, in 1825) and southern Florida (U.S.A.). Like P. guajava, it is often considered an aggressive weed. It has leathery leaves and the fruit (generally much smaller than that of P. guajava) is red (sometimes yellow) with a white pulp. (Whistler 1995)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Distribution

provided by EOL staff

Guava (Psidium guajava) is native to tropical America, probably from southern Mexico south to South America, but its range has been dramatically increased via cultivation. It is now cultivated (and escaped and naturalized and often considered an invasive pest) in southern Florida (including the Florida Keys), Bermuda, and throughout the West Indies from the Bahamas and Cuba to Trinidad, and south to Brazil. It is also cultivated and naturalized in much of the Old World tropics and subtropics. (Little and Wadsworth 1964) It was first recorded from the Pacific Islands (Hawaii) by the early 1800s (Whistler 1995).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Habitat

provided by EOL staff

In the Pacific Islands, Guava (Psidium guajava) is common in dry to wet disturbed areas such as pastures, waste places, and scrub forest up to 1200 meters elevation (Whistler 1995). In Puerto Rico, it forms thickets and spreads in pastures, especially on the coastal plains but also in the lower mountain regions (Little and Wadsworth 1964). In southern Florida, it now grows wild along roadsides, in old fields, and in hardwood hammocks (Elias 1980), among other habitats.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Lookalikes

provided by EOL staff

The Strawberry Guava (Psidium cattleianum) is another native of tropical America that has spread widely in the tropics, including the Pacific Islands (where it was first recorded, in Hawaii, in 1825) and southern Florida (U.S.A.). Like P. guajava, it is often considered an aggressive weed. It has leathery leaves and the fruit (generally much smaller than that of P. guajava) is red (sometimes yellow) with a white pulp. (Whistler 1995)

In southern Florida and the Caribbean, the native P. longipes is more rarely encountered than P. guajava. Compared with P. guajava, it has smaller leaves (with tips sometimes notched) and the much smaller ripe fruits are dark rather than yellow. (Elias 1980; Petrides 1988)

Other Psidium species are found in Mexico and Central and South America.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Morphology

provided by EOL staff

Guava (Psidium guajava) is a shrubby small evergreen tree (rarely with straight stems) up to 10 meters in height, with smooth reddish brown bark that is thin and scales off in thin sheets. It has oppositely arranged oblong or elliptic leaves with sunken parallel veins and minute glandular dots. The fragrant white flowers are large, measuring about 4 cm across the 4 or 5 large petals, and bear numerous showy brushlike stamens with slender white filaments averaging about 1.2 cm long. The flowers are mostly borne singly at leaf bases. The edible guava fruits are yellow and rounded (sometimes pear-shaped), 3 to 10 cm in diameter, with 4 or 5 retained sepals at the apex. (Little and Wadsworth 1964; Whistler 1995)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Reproduction

provided by EOL staff

Guava (Psidium guajava) flowers and fruits nearly year-round (Little and Wadsworth 1964).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Risk Statement

provided by EOL staff

In the Pacific Islands, Guava (Psidium guajava) was originally introduced for its edible fruit, but is now a serious weed in pastures and elsewhere (Whistler 1995). It is considered invasive in Florida, as well (Gann et al. 2008).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Uses

provided by EOL staff

Guava (Psidium guajava) is commonly cultivated as a fruit tree. The fruit (which is technically a type of berry) has a thin, yellow, slightly sour edible outer layer; within, there are numerous yellow seeds more than 3 to 5 mm long in a juicy pinkish or yellow pulp. The fruits are unusually rich in vitamin C. The outer layer of the fruit is preserved and canned commercially, as is the juice. Guava powder has been prepared from the dehydrated fruits as well. In some regions, the bark has been used for tanning. Extracts from leaves, bark, roots, and buds have been used in folk medicine. (Little and Wadsworth 1964)

Guava leaves are often boiled into a tea to treat diarrhea on many of the Pacific Islands (Whistler 1995).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Derivation of specific name

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
guajava: South American spanish name for the Guava
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Psidium guajava L. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=142270
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Evergreen or semi-deciduous small tree with distinctive flaking yellow and light brown bark.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Psidium guajava L. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=142270
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Frequency

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Common
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Psidium guajava L. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=142270
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Worldwide distribution

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Native of tropical America; naturalised elsewhere
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Psidium guajava L. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=142270
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Psidium guajava

provided by wikipedia EN

 src=
Flower
 src=
Leafbud
 src=
Common guava seedling, 14 months

Psidium guajava, the common guava,[2] yellow guava,[2] or lemon guava,[2] is an evergreen shrub or small tree native to the Caribbean, Central America and South America.[2] It is easily pollinated by insects; when cultivated, it is pollinated mainly by the common honey bee, Apis mellifera.

Overview

 src=
P. guajava fruit

Widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions around the world, guava fruits can range in size from as small as an apricot to as large as a grapefruit. Various cultivars have white, pink, or red flesh; a few varieties feature red (instead of green or yellow) skin.

When cultivated from seed, guavas are notable for their extremely slow growth rate for several months, before a very rapid acceleration in growth rate takes over. From seed, common guavas may bloom and set fruit in as few as two years or as many as eight. Cuttings, grafting, and air layering are more commonly used as a propagation method in commercial groves. Highly adaptable, guavas can be easily grown as container plants in temperate regions, though their ability to bloom and set fruit is somewhat less predictable. In some tropical locations, guavas can become invasive. It has become a major problem in the Galápagos Islands.[3]

The plant is used in many different shampoo products for its scent. It is also becoming a popular bonsai species and is currently quite popular in India and Eastern Asia.[4]

 src=
Red guava Psidium guajava
 src=
The flowers of Psidium guajava. It is an evergreen shrub or small tree.

Chemistry

The leaves of P. guajava contain the flavonol morin, morin-3-O-lyxoside, morin-3-O-arabinoside, quercetin and quercetin-3-O-arabinoside.[5]

Wood

Guava wood from Hawaii is commonly used for the smoking of meat. The wood is resistant to insect and fungal attack. The density of oven-dry wood is about 670 kg/m3 (1,130 lb/cu yd) and has been found suitable for roof trusses in Nigeria.[6]

Traditional medicine

Psidium guajava has been used in traditional medicine by many cultures throughout Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and Asia.[7] It is used for inflammation, diabetes, hypertension, caries, wounds, pain relief, fever, diarrhea, rheumatism, lung diseases, and ulcers.[7]

Use as food and feed

Guava is an edible fruit, and can be eaten raw or cooked. The processing of the fruits yields by-products that can be fed to livestock. The leaves can also be used as fodder.[8]

References

  1. ^ Canteiro, C. & Lucas, E. (2019). "Psidium guajava". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2019: e.T49485755A49485759. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "Psidium guajava". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved February 6, 2009.
  3. ^ "Forest of daisy trees in Santa Cruz | Wondermondo". 11 March 2012.
  4. ^ D'Cruz, Mark. "Ma-Ke Bonsai Care Guide for Psidium guajava". Ma-Ke Bonsai. Retrieved April 22, 2011.
  5. ^ Bacteriostatic effect of flavonoids isolated from leaves of Psidium guajava on fish pathogens. Rattanachaikunsopon Pongsak and Phumkhachorn Parichat, Fitoterapia, 2007, volume 78, number 6, pages 434-436, INIST:19087798
  6. ^ https://ecommons.library.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/10508/1/BC%2005%20010%20Olorunnisola%20final%2017June2006.pdf
  7. ^ a b Gutiérrez, RM; Mitchell, S; Solis, RV (2008). "Psidium guajava: A review of its traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology". Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 117 (1): 1–27. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2008.01.025. PMID 18353572.
  8. ^ Heuzé V., Tran G., Bastianelli D., Lebas F., 2017. Guava (Psidium guajava). Feedipedia, a programme by INRA, CIRAD, AFZ and FAO. https://www.feedipedia.org/node/111 Last updated on May 5, 2017, 10:59

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Psidium guajava: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
 src= Flower  src= Leafbud  src= Common guava seedling, 14 months

Psidium guajava, the common guava, yellow guava, or lemon guava, is an evergreen shrub or small tree native to the Caribbean, Central America and South America. It is easily pollinated by insects; when cultivated, it is pollinated mainly by the common honey bee, Apis mellifera.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN