dcsimg

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Annual or biennial herbs. Basal leaves entire or pinnatifid; cauline amplexicaul. Inflorescence an elongated raceme. Flowers (in ours) white. Sepals not saccate. Petals 4. Stamens 6. Silicula flattened, triangular-obcordate with keeled net-veined valves. Seeds several in each loculus.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Capsella Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/genus.php?genus_id=625
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Capsella (plant)

provided by wikipedia EN

Capsella is a genus of herbaceous plant and biennial plants in the family Brassicaceae.[1] It is a close relative of Arabidopsis, Neslia, and Halimolobos.[2]

Some authors circumscribe Capsella to contain only three species: Capsella bursa-pastoris, Capsella rubella and Capsella grandiflora.[2] As of 2020, Kew's Plants of the World Online list eight species.[3]

Capsella rubella is a self-fertilizing species that became self-compatible 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. Its outcrossing progenitor was Capsella grandiflora. In general, the shift from outcrossing to self-fertilization is among the most common transitions in flowering plants. Capsella rubella is studied as a model for understanding the evolution of self-fertilization.[4][5]

The name is said to derive from Latin capsa, a box or case, alluding to fruit resembling a medieval wallet or purse;[6] the suffix -ella denotes "lesser".[7]

Species

Species include:[3]

References

  1. ^ "19. Capsella Medikus". Flora of China.
  2. ^ a b Slotte, T.; Ceplitis, A.; Neuffer, B.; Hurka, H.; Lascoux, M. (2006). "Intrageneric phylogeny of Capsella (Brassicaceae) and the origin of the tetraploid C. bursa-pastoris based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences". American Journal of Botany. 93 (11): 1714–1724. doi:10.3732/ajb.93.11.1714. PMID 21642116.
  3. ^ a b "Capsella Medik". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 31 December 2020.
  4. ^ Brandvain Y, Slotte T, Hazzouri KM, Wright SI, Coop G (2013). "Genomic identification of founding haplotypes reveals the history of the selfing species Capsella rubella". PLOS Genet. 9 (9): e1003754. arXiv:1307.4118. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003754. PMC 3772084. PMID 24068948.
  5. ^ Slotte T, Hazzouri KM, Ågren JA, Koenig D, Maumus F, Guo YL, Steige K, Platts AE, Escobar JS, Newman LK, Wang W, Mandáková T, Vello E, Smith LM, Henz SR, Steffen J, Takuno S, Brandvain Y, Coop G, Andolfatto P, Hu TT, Blanchette M, Clark RM, Quesneville H, Nordborg M, Gaut BS, Lysak MA, Jenkins J, Grimwood J, Chapman J, Prochnik S, Shu S, Rokhsar D, Schmutz J, Weigel D, Wright SI (July 2013). "The Capsella rubella genome and the genomic consequences of rapid mating system evolution". Nat. Genet. 45 (7): 831–5. doi:10.1038/ng.2669. PMID 23749190.
  6. ^ "Capsella". Flora of North America. efloras.org. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  7. ^ Gledhill, D. (1985). The names of plants. Cambridge University Press. p. 82. ISBN 0521305497.
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Capsella (plant): Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Capsella is a genus of herbaceous plant and biennial plants in the family Brassicaceae. It is a close relative of Arabidopsis, Neslia, and Halimolobos.

Some authors circumscribe Capsella to contain only three species: Capsella bursa-pastoris, Capsella rubella and Capsella grandiflora. As of 2020, Kew's Plants of the World Online list eight species.

Capsella rubella is a self-fertilizing species that became self-compatible 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. Its outcrossing progenitor was Capsella grandiflora. In general, the shift from outcrossing to self-fertilization is among the most common transitions in flowering plants. Capsella rubella is studied as a model for understanding the evolution of self-fertilization.

The name is said to derive from Latin capsa, a box or case, alluding to fruit resembling a medieval wallet or purse; the suffix -ella denotes "lesser".

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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visit source
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wikipedia EN