dcsimg

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Shrubs or trees. Stipules present. Leaves unlobed or palmately lobed, petiolate, palmately-nerved; indumentum of stellate hairs often mixed with simple or glandular hairs. Flowers in axillary or terminal cymes or umbellate cymes, bisexual, white, pink or purplish. Bracts usually 3, caducous. Calyx of 5 lobes, reflexed in mature flowers. Petals 5, persistent and becoming papery or scarious in fruit. Staminodes 5, conspicuous. Ovary 3-5-locular. Fruit a dehiscent, ovoid or spherical, capsule.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Dombeya Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/genus.php?genus_id=950
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Flora of Zimbabwe

Dombeya

provided by wikipedia EN
Dombeya of L'Héritier de Brutelle is a synonym of Tourrettia (Bignoniaceae). Dombeya of Lamarck is a synonym of Araucaria.

Dombeya is a flowering plant genus. Traditionally included in the family Sterculiaceae, it is included in the expanded Malvaceae in the APG and most subsequent systematics. These plants are known by a number of vernacular names which sometimes, misleadingly, allude to the superficial similarity of flowering Dombeya to pears or hydrangeas (which are unrelated). Therefore, the genus as a whole is often simply called dombeyas. The generic name commemorates Joseph Dombey (1742–1794), a French botanist and explorer in South America, involved in the notorious Dombey affair, embroiling scientists and governments of France, Spain, and Britain for more than two years.

These plants grow chiefly throughout Africa and Madagascar. Formerly believed to hold only about 80 species, in the present delimitation, Dombeya is one of the most speciose Malvaceae genera, containing some 255 species. Most have been moved here from distinct genera, which are now considered junior synonyms.[1] Some of these might warrant recognition as subgenera, to show the evolutionary and phylogenetic patterns of the numerous dombeyas more clearly.[2] In addition to the synonyms listed here, Astiria is suspected to be a rather distinct derivative of Dombeya and would thus have to be included in the present genus.[2] This requires renaming of species, as A. rosea conflicts with D. rosea, a junior synonym of D. burgessiae. Furthermore, several species have been moved here from related genera that are still valid, namely Pentapetes.[1]

Selected species

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Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Hinsley (2008)
  2. ^ a b Cao et al. (2006)
  3. ^ Cao et al. (2006), Hinsley (2008)

References

  • Cao, Nathanaël; Le Pechon, Timothée & Zaragüeta-Bagils, René (2006): Does minimizing homoplasy really maximize homology? MaHo: A method for evaluating homology among most parsimonious trees. C. R. Palevol 7(1): 17–26. doi:10.1016/j.crpv.2007.12.008 (HTML abstract)
  • Hinsley, Stewart R. (2008): Partial Synonymy of Dombeya. Retrieved 2008-JUN-25.

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Dombeya: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
Dombeya of L'Héritier de Brutelle is a synonym of Tourrettia (Bignoniaceae). Dombeya of Lamarck is a synonym of Araucaria.

Dombeya is a flowering plant genus. Traditionally included in the family Sterculiaceae, it is included in the expanded Malvaceae in the APG and most subsequent systematics. These plants are known by a number of vernacular names which sometimes, misleadingly, allude to the superficial similarity of flowering Dombeya to pears or hydrangeas (which are unrelated). Therefore, the genus as a whole is often simply called dombeyas. The generic name commemorates Joseph Dombey (1742–1794), a French botanist and explorer in South America, involved in the notorious Dombey affair, embroiling scientists and governments of France, Spain, and Britain for more than two years.

These plants grow chiefly throughout Africa and Madagascar. Formerly believed to hold only about 80 species, in the present delimitation, Dombeya is one of the most speciose Malvaceae genera, containing some 255 species. Most have been moved here from distinct genera, which are now considered junior synonyms. Some of these might warrant recognition as subgenera, to show the evolutionary and phylogenetic patterns of the numerous dombeyas more clearly. In addition to the synonyms listed here, Astiria is suspected to be a rather distinct derivative of Dombeya and would thus have to be included in the present genus. This requires renaming of species, as A. rosea conflicts with D. rosea, a junior synonym of D. burgessiae. Furthermore, several species have been moved here from related genera that are still valid, namely Pentapetes.

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copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN