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Distribution

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Himalaya (Kumaun to Bhutan), India, Burma, Malaysia.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Elevation Range

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300-1300 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Physical Description

provided by USDA PLANTS text
Perennial, Shrubs, Herbs, Stems woody below, or from woody crown or caudex, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems or branches arching, spreading or decumbent, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems 1-2 m tall, Stems greater than 2 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Stem hairs hispid to villous, Stems hairs pilose or spreading, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules inconspicuous, absent, or caducous, Stipules setiform, subulate or acicular, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves odd pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Leaflets 10-many, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence axillary, Inflorescence terminal, Inflorescence leaf-opposed, Bracts conspicuously present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals white, Petals orange or yellow, Banner petal ovoid or obovate, Banner petal suborbicular, broadly rounded, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing petals auriculate, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel petals auriculate, spurred, or gibbous, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style sharply bent, Style hairy, Style hairy on one side only, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocul ar, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit exserted from calyx, Valves twisting or coiling after dehiscence, Fruit beaked, Fruit hairy, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds ovoid to rounded in outline, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black, Seed surface mottled or patchy.
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Dr. David Bogler
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Missouri Botanical Garden
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USDA NRCS NPDC
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USDA PLANTS text

Tephrosia candida

provided by wikipedia EN

Tephrosia candida, the white hoarypea,[3] is a perennial shrub, native to India, in the legume family.[1] It has been introduced to Malesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia and Australia.[1]

Etymology

The genus name, Tephrosia, derives from the Greek tephros (ash-coloured) and refers to the fact that most of the species are covered with grey hairs.[4]. The species epithet, candida, derives from the Latin adjective, candidus,-a,-um, meaning pure white.[5]

Agricultural Benefits

In Zimbabwe, the use of different taxa of the genus Tephrosia has been studied as a way to enrich soils by intercropping when growing maize. This allows continual nourishment of the soil. Specifically, T. candida was proven to successfully grow in conditions of high population density, yet further research into this growth option is required.[6] To further investigate the genus Tephrosia and its effective growth in stressful habitats, researchers at the University of Zimbabwe studied carbon and nitrogen mineralization patterns of this legume. Mineralization, or the decomposition of organic matter, provides fixed nitrogen for other plants to use. They found that Tephrosia released nitrogen at a slow rate. This pattern could be due to nitrogen binding to polyphenols, or natural organic molecules. This prevents subsequent loss of nitrogen and promotes crop uptake along with nitrogen release.[7] Polyphenol to nitrogen ratios within plants can give evidence toward the quality of biomass and can predict the nitrogen release pattern. While there exist several Tephrosia taxa that exhibit slow nitrogen release, many possess rapid rates of nitrogen release as well. Rapid release is not necessarily compatible with intercropping because it does not share this pattern with maize. However, the slow release of nitrogen in the T. candida species is able to synchronize with the nitrogen demand of maize, benefiting the remaining maize in the following season.[6] Other benefits of T. candida include higher biomass production, nematode resistance, closed canopy growth and weed suppression.[6]

Introduced/Invasive

It is on the Global Register of Introduced and Invasive Species for the following countries and islands: Brazil, Palau, Samoa, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia (Pohnpei, Yap and State of Chuuk), Democratic Republic of the Congo, Niue, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.[8]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Govaerts, R. et. al. (2018) Plants of the world online: Tephrosia candida. Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  2. ^ de Candolle, A.P. (1825) Prodr. 2: 249
  3. ^ "Tephrosia candida". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 14 December 2015.
  4. ^ Electronic Flora of South Australia genus Fact Sheet: Tephrosia Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  5. ^ Plantillustrations.org: Tephrosia candida. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  6. ^ a b c Mafongoya, P. L., et al. “Tephrosia species and provenances for improved fallows in southern Africa”. Agroforestry Systems. 59(2003): 279-288.
  7. ^ Nezomba, H.; Tauro, T.P.; Mtambanengwe, F.; Mapfumo, P. (2009). "Indigenous legumes biomass quality and influence on C and N mineralization under indigenous legume fallow systems". Symbiosis. 48 (1–3): 78–91. doi:10.1007/BF03179987. ISSN 0334-5114.
  8. ^ GBIF: Tephrosia candida. Retrieved 20 December 2018.

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Tephrosia candida: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Tephrosia candida, the white hoarypea, is a perennial shrub, native to India, in the legume family. It has been introduced to Malesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia and Australia.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN