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Pseudotrillium

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Pseudotrillium is a monotypic genus of flowering plants in the family Melanthiaceae containing the single species Pseudotrillium rivale. The genus was proposed in 2002 on the basis of morphology and molecular evidence that suggest the plant should no longer be included in genus Trillium.[3]

Pseudotrillium rivale, known by the common name brook wakerobin,[4] is endemic to the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon and northern California. The Latin specific epithet rivale means “growing by streams”, with reference to a preferred habitat.[5]

Description

Pseudotrillium rivale is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial growing up to 20 cm (7.9 in) in height. The three bracts have generally lance-shaped blades up to 11 cm (4.3 in) long borne on petioles 1 to 3 cm (0.4 to 1.2 in) in length. The blades are glossy blue-green with silvery venations. Atop the whorl of bracts, on a pedicel 2.5 to 11 cm (1.0 to 4.3 in) high, is a single nodding non-fragrant flower with green sepals and pink-blushed white petals up to 3 cm (1.2 in) long by 2 cm (0.8 in) wide.[6][7]

Distribution

Pseudotrillium rivale is endemic to the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon (Josephine, Coos, Douglas, and Curry counties) and northern California (Siskiyou and Del Norte counties), usually on soils of ultramafic origin, such as serpentine.[8][9] California plants, growing in a dense damp woods, are larger than Oregon plants in all respects with a strong tendency to produce colored flowers. In contrast, Oregon plants found in dry open woods are tiny plants with freckled white flowers.[10]

Ecology

Pseudotrillium rivale flowers April to June (late March to early May at the higher elevations), with northern California plants flowering somewhat later than those in Oregon. After flowering, the entire plant may enlarge and become more robust and turgid with very glossy leaves. Initially the pedicel is of moderate length but it soon begins to lengthen and twist in a most unusual way. If fertilization is successful, the pedicel arches downward so that the fruit comes in contact with the soil. By mid-July, the entire plant withers and goes dormant.[6][7][10]

Uses

Under its former name, Trillium rivale, this plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[11][12] Hardy down to −10 °C (14 °F), it requires a sheltered position in partial or full shade.[11]

References

  1. ^ "Pseudotrillium rivale". NatureServe Explorer. NatureServe. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  2. ^ "Pseudotrillium rivale (S.Watson) S.B.Farmer". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  3. ^ Farmer, Susan B.; Schilling, Edward E. (October 2002). "Phylogenetic Analyses of Trilliaceae based on Morphological and Molecular Data" (PDF). Systematic Botany. 27 (4): 674–692.
  4. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Trillium rivale". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  5. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for Gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. ISBN 184533731X.
  6. ^ a b Jepson Flora Project (ed.). "Pseudotrillium rivale". Jepson eFlora. The Jepson Herbarium, University of California, Berkeley.
  7. ^ a b Case Jr., Frederick W. (2002). "Trillium rivale". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). Vol. 26. New York and Oxford. Retrieved July 16, 2019 – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
  8. ^ "Pseudotrillium rivale". County-level distribution map from the North American Plant Atlas (NAPA). Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2014. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  9. ^ "Pseudotrillium rivale". Calflora. Berkeley, California: The Calflora Database. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  10. ^ a b Dusek, Edith (Fall 1980). "Trilliums western style" (PDF). American Rock Garden Society Bulletin. 38 (4): 157–167. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  11. ^ a b "Trillium rivale". www.rhs.org. Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  12. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. November 2018. Retrieved 17 August 2019.

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Pseudotrillium: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Pseudotrillium is a monotypic genus of flowering plants in the family Melanthiaceae containing the single species Pseudotrillium rivale. The genus was proposed in 2002 on the basis of morphology and molecular evidence that suggest the plant should no longer be included in genus Trillium.

Pseudotrillium rivale, known by the common name brook wakerobin, is endemic to the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon and northern California. The Latin specific epithet rivale means “growing by streams”, with reference to a preferred habitat.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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