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Mangrove Red Snapper

Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Forsskål 1775)

Diagnostic Description

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Preopercular notch and knob poorly developed. Scale rows on back more or less parallel to lateral line, or parallel below spinous part of dorsal fin and sometimes rising obliquely posteriorly, or rarely with entirely oblique rows. Generally greenish brown on back, grading to reddish on sides and ventral parts. Trawl specimens from deep water frequently are reddish with dark scale centers and white scale margins, giving a reticulated appearance. Juveniles with a series of about eight whitish bars crossing sides, and 1 or 2 blue lines across cheek. (Ref. 37816). Dorsal greenish brown, ventral white or greenish grey, sides reddish; bars 8 white and streaks 2 blue across cheeks (in juveniles). Body depth 2.3-2.7 in SL. Preopercular notch poorly developed. Dorsal scale rows parallel to LL. (Ref. 90102).
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Recorder
Rainer Froese
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Diseases and Parasites

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Goezia Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Allan Palacio
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Migration

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Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Susan M. Luna
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Morphology

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Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13 - 14; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 7 - 8
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Threats

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Least Concern (LC)
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Trophic Strategy

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Euryhaline species (Ref. 12743). Juveniles and young adults occur in mangrove estuaries, the lower reaches of freshwater streams (Ref. 30573, 48635, 44894) and tidal creeks (Ref. 44894). Adults are often found in groups around coral reefs (Ref. 9710). Eventually migrate offshore to deeper reef areas, sometimes penetrating to depths in excess of 100 m. Mainly nocturnal, feed mostly on fishes and crustaceans (Ref. 55). Habitat frequently consists of areas of abundant shelter in the form of caves or overhanging ledges. Carnivore (Ref. 57615).
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Susan M. Luna
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Biology

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A euryhaline species (Ref. 12743). Juveniles and young adults occur in mangrove estuaries, the lower reaches of freshwater streams (Ref. 30573, 48635, 44894) and tidal creeks (Ref. 44894). Adults are often found in groups around coral reefs (Ref. 9710). Eventually migrate offshore to deeper reef areas, sometimes penetrating to depths in excess of 100 m. Mainly nocturnal, this species feeds mostly on fishes and crustaceans. Excellent food fish (Ref. 5484, 44894). An important market species throughout the Indo-Pacific region, but never found in large quantities. A good aquaculture species because it doesn’t get rancid easily when frozen (Ref. 47992). It commands a good export market price with no limit on body size (Ref. 47992). No reported damaging diseases (Ref. 47992). Found in Hong Kong live fish markets (Ref. 27253). Max length is 104 cm, max weight 14.5 kg and max age 39 years for specimens from the east coast of Australia (pers. comm., Andrew McDougall, 2007).
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Importance

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fisheries: commercial; aquaculture: commercial; gamefish: yes
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分布

provided by The Fish Database of Taiwan
廣泛分布於印度-西太平洋區。西起非洲東岸,東至薩摩亞(Samoa),南自澳洲,北迄琉球群島。台灣各地河口、紅樹林及礁砂混合的海域均有產,以西南海域較多。
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臺灣魚類資料庫
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利用

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本種魚為印度-太平洋區重要之食用魚,一般皆以一支釣、底棲延繩釣和拖網等漁法捕獲,亦為笛鯛類淺海養殖之主要種類,常供海釣池用。
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描述

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體長橢圓形,背緣和腹緣圓鈍,背緣稍呈弧狀彎曲。兩眼間隔平坦。上頜兩側具細尖齒,多埋於上唇內,前端具大犬齒2顆;下頜為疏鬆圓錐齒,前端無犬齒;鋤骨、腭骨及舌面均具絨毛狀齒。體被中大櫛鱗,頰部及鰓蓋具多列鱗;背鰭、臀鰭和尾鰭基部大部分亦被細鱗;側線完全,側線鱗列數44-48;側線上方前半部的鱗片排列與側線平行,僅後半斜行。背鰭軟硬鰭條部間具深刻;臀鰭基底短而與背鰭軟條部相對;背鰭硬棘X,軟條13-14;臀鰭硬棘III,軟條8;胸鰭長而略等於頭長;尾鰭近截形,微凹。體為一致之紅褐色至深褐色,幼魚之體側則有7-8條銀色橫帶,隨成長而消失。
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棲地

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廣鹽性之魚類,幼魚和稚魚棲息於河口、紅樹林區以及潮汐所及之河川下游,成魚後則遷移至珊瑚礁區形成群體,最後會向外海移動至較深的礁區,有時可棲息於水深達100公尺左右處。主要攝食魚類及甲殼類。
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Mangrove red snapper

provided by wikipedia EN

The mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus), commonly called mangrove jack within Australia, is a species of snapper. It is also known as creek red bream, the Stuart evader, dog bream, mangrove red snapper, purple sea perch, purple sea-perch, , red bream, red perch, red reef bream, river roman, or rock barramundi.[1]

Distribution

The mangrove red snapper is native to the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean from the African coast to Samoa and the Line Islands and from the Ryukyus in the north to Australia in the south. It has also been recorded from the coast of Lebanon in the Mediterranean Sea, having reached there from the Red Sea through the Suez Canal, though it is not established in the Mediterranean.[2]

Description

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Mangrove red snapper

Coloration of the mangrove red snapper ranges from burnt orange, to copper, to bronze and dark reddish-brown, depending on its age and environment. Younger fish caught in estuarine areas are often darker than older fish taken from offshore reef areas,[3] and exhibit lighter vertical bands down their flanks.

Like other tropical snappers (family Lutjanidae), mangrove jacks have prominent canine teeth in their jaws that are used for seizing and holding prey. These teeth can cause a nasty injury to unwary fishers.[1]

In reef areas, mangrove red snappers are sometimes confused with two-spot red snapper or red bass (Lutjanus bohar), a known carrier of ciguatera toxin. The red bass, however, is usually darker in coloration, has fewer dorsal-fin spines, scale rows on the back that rise obliquely from the lateral line, and a deep groove from the nostrils to the eyes.[1]

Diet

The species is carnivorous: they are predators, feeding mainly at night on fishes, crustaceans, gastropods, and cephalopod molluscs.[1] As ambush predators, they often dwell around mangrove roots, fallen trees, rock walls, and any other snag areas where smaller prey reside for protection.

Habitat and behaviour

As its name implies, the mangrove red snapper is commonly found in mangrove-lined estuarine systems, although is known to migrate to offshore reefs to spawn. As they mature, mangrove red snappers move into open waters, sometimes hundreds of kilometers from the coast[4] to breed. These larger fish are sometimes caught by bottom-fishers with heavy tackle, though they still remain difficult to land due to their speed and proximity to sharp reef bottoms.

Fisheries

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Mangrove Red Snapper 3 Lb

Mangrove red snapper is a popular and important commercial and recreational fish throughout its range, and considered to be an excellent food fish.[1]

For fishermen, the telltale sign of a hooked mangrove red snapper is the explosive run for cover once the bait (or lure) is taken. Many fish (and so lures) are lost once they reach the protection of the snags as a result of their initial burst of speed.

The mangrove red snapper is a highly regarded table fish with firm, sweet-tasting, white flesh. While often a nuisance species when targeting the infamous barramundi, many fisherman rate the eating qualities of the jack higher than it.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Martin F. Gomon & Dianne J. Bray (2011) Mangrove Jack, Lutjanus argentimaculatus, in Fishes of Australia. Retrieved 29 Aug 2014.
  2. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Lutjanus argentimaculatus" in FishBase. December 2013 version.
  3. ^ Queensland Government Fish Note Archived 2006-08-22 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Russell, D.J., et al., "Biology, Management and Genetic Stock Structure of Mangrove Jack (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) in Australia," The State of Queensland, Department of Primary Industries and the Fisheries Research Development Corporation, FRDC Project Number 1999/122, 2003.

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Mangrove red snapper: Brief Summary

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The mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus), commonly called mangrove jack within Australia, is a species of snapper. It is also known as creek red bream, the Stuart evader, dog bream, mangrove red snapper, purple sea perch, purple sea-perch, , red bream, red perch, red reef bream, river roman, or rock barramundi.

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Juveniles and young adults occur in mangrove estuaries and in the lower reaches of freshwater streams. Eventually they migrate offshore to deeper reef areas, sometimes penetrating to depths in excess of 100 m. Mainly nocturnal, this species feeds mostly on fishes and crustaceans. This is an important market species throughout the Indo-Pacific region, but never found in large quantities.
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bibliographic citation
Froese, R. & D. Pauly (Editors). (2019). FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (02/2019). Mouneimne, N. (1979). Poissons nouveaux pour les cotes libanaises. <em>Cybium.</em> 6: 105-110.
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Edward Vanden Berghe [email]