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Ceriodaphnia dubia

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Ceriodaphnia dubia is a species of water flea in the class Branchiopoda, living in freshwater lakes, ponds, and marshes in most of the world. They are small, generally less than 1 millimetre (0.039 in) in length. Males are smaller than females. Ceriodaphnia dubia move by using a powerful set of second antennae.[2] Ceriodaphnia dubia is used in toxicity testing of wastewater treatment plant effluent water in the United States.[3] Climate change and particularly ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may seriously damage Ceriodaphnia dubia populations, as they seems to be more sensitive than other cladocerans as Daphnia pulex - pulicaria[4].

References

  1. ^ S. J. Brands. "Ceriodaphnia dubia - Hierarchy". The Taxonomicon. Universal Taxonomic Services, Zwaag, The Netherlands. Retrieved February 3, 2010.
  2. ^ "Daphnids: Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna". Marinco Bioassay Laboratory, Inc. 2005.
  3. ^ Donald E. Francisco; Michael C. Elias; Christine A. LaRocca; Francis A. DiGiano; Marilyn J. Maerker. "Chronic toxicity bioassay with Ceriodaphnia dubia". University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Archived from the original on July 15, 2009. Retrieved August 26, 2011.
  4. ^ Fernández, Carla Eloisa; Rejas, Danny (2017-04-05). "Effects of UVB radiation on grazing of two cladocerans from high-altitude Andean lakes". PLOS ONE. 12 (4): e0174334. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0174334. ISSN 1932-6203. PMC 5381789. PMID 28379975.
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Ceriodaphnia dubia: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ceriodaphnia dubia is a species of water flea in the class Branchiopoda, living in freshwater lakes, ponds, and marshes in most of the world. They are small, generally less than 1 millimetre (0.039 in) in length. Males are smaller than females. Ceriodaphnia dubia move by using a powerful set of second antennae. Ceriodaphnia dubia is used in toxicity testing of wastewater treatment plant effluent water in the United States. Climate change and particularly ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may seriously damage Ceriodaphnia dubia populations, as they seems to be more sensitive than other cladocerans as Daphnia pulex - pulicaria.

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