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Autumn Zephyrlily

Zephyranthes candida (Lindl.) Herb.

Comments

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W. Herbert (1837) suggested that Zephyranthes candida might belong in a segregate genus, and within ten years Rafinesque and M. Roemer each separated it from Zephyranthes. Its leaves are about twice as thick as those of other species in the genus, and they persist through winter frosts and snow, a rare, if not unique, characteristic in Zephyranthes. The stigmatic lobes are not globose, as in Z. chlorosolen, but are somewhat erect and might be described as very abbreviated linear lobes; a careful study of fresh stigmas of “capitate” species is in order. Also, the chromosome complement of Z. candida appears to be anomalous within Zephyranthes. The species has been maintained in Zephyranthes for more than a century, but were Herbert, Rafinesque, and Roemer correct after all?
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 297, 299, 302, 303 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Description

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Leaf blade glossy deep green, to 3 mm wide. Spathe (1.8–)2–4 cm. Flowers erect; perianth white, sometimes pinkish abaxially, subrotate, 3–4.5 cm; perianth tube green, 0.1–0.4 cm, increasing in diam., less than 1/4 times perianth length, 1/5–1/3 times filament length, ca. 1/10 times spathe length; tepals not reflexed; stamens diverging, subequal; filaments filiform, 1–1.4 cm; anthers 5–8 mm; style longer than perianth tube; stigma capitate, usually among or exserted less than 2 mm beyond anthers; pedicel (0.4–)1–2.5 cm, usually shorter than spathe. 2n = 38.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 297, 299, 302, 303 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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eFloras

Description

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Bulbs ovoid, ca. 2.5 cm in diam., neck 2.5--5 cm. Leaves bright green, terete-linear, 20--30 cm × 2--4 mm, fleshy. Involucres red-brown. Flowers solitary, terminal; pedicel ca. 1 cm. Perianth white, often tinged with rose abaxially; lobes ± free, 3--5 × ca. 1 cm, usually with tiny scales near throat, apex obtuse to shortly acute. Stamens ca. 1/2 as long as perianth. Style slender; stigma 3-notched. Capsule subglobose, ca. 1.2 cm in diam. Fl. autumn.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 24: 265 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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introduced; Ala., Fla., Ga., La., Miss., N.C., S.C., Tex.; South America (Argentina, Peru, Uruguay).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 297, 299, 302, 303 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering summer--mid fall (Jun--Nov).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 297, 299, 302, 303 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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Habitat

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Sandy humus soil, coastal plains; 0-200m.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 297, 299, 302, 303 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat & Distribution

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Widely cultivated as an ornamental. Becoming naturalized in S China [native to South America].
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 24: 265 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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partner site
eFloras

Synonym

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Amaryllis candida Lindley, Bot. Reg. 9: plate 724. 1823; Argyropsis candida (Lindley) M. Roemer; Atamosco candida (Lindley) Sasaki; Plectronema candida (Lindley) Rafinesque
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 297, 299, 302, 303 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Amaryllis candida Lindley, Bot. Reg. 9: t. 724. 1823; Argyropsis candida (Lindley) M. Roemer.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 24: 265 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Zephyranthes candida

provided by wikipedia EN

Zephyranthes candida, with common names that include autumn zephyrlily,[2] white windflower[3] and Peruvian swamp lily,[4] is a species of rain lily native to South America including Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil. The species is widely cultivated as an ornamental and reportedly naturalized in many places (South Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Zimbabwe, Seychelles, central and southern China, Korea, Nansei-shoto (Ryukyu Islands), Bhutan, Solomon Islands, Queensland, Nauru, Tonga, Society Islands, Mariana Islands, southeastern United States (from Texas to North Carolina), the Lesser Antilles, and Peru).[5][6]

Leaves are a deep glossy green and measure 3 mm wide. Flowers, which bud late in August (when propagated in the Northern Hemisphere) at first resemble a new leaf, but emerge from their papery sheaves to a stunning whiteness; they are erect in perianth white and sometimes pinkish abaxially. The leaf-like bract is 1.8 to 4 cm. They grow best in full sun to part shade and require a medium wet soil. Propagation is done by dividing bulbs or offsets and from seed.[7][8][9][10]

Zephyranthes candida was first described by John Lindley in 1823 as Amaryllis candida.[8] It was transferred to its current genus in 1826 by William Herbert.[7][3] Other common names of Zephyranthes candida include August rain lily, white zephyr lily, white fairy lily, white rain lily, and autumn zephyr lily.

Cultivation

Hardiness: USDA zones 7-10.

References

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Zephyranthes candida: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Zephyranthes candida, with common names that include autumn zephyrlily, white windflower and Peruvian swamp lily, is a species of rain lily native to South America including Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil. The species is widely cultivated as an ornamental and reportedly naturalized in many places (South Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Zimbabwe, Seychelles, central and southern China, Korea, Nansei-shoto (Ryukyu Islands), Bhutan, Solomon Islands, Queensland, Nauru, Tonga, Society Islands, Mariana Islands, southeastern United States (from Texas to North Carolina), the Lesser Antilles, and Peru).

Leaves are a deep glossy green and measure 3 mm wide. Flowers, which bud late in August (when propagated in the Northern Hemisphere) at first resemble a new leaf, but emerge from their papery sheaves to a stunning whiteness; they are erect in perianth white and sometimes pinkish abaxially. The leaf-like bract is 1.8 to 4 cm. They grow best in full sun to part shade and require a medium wet soil. Propagation is done by dividing bulbs or offsets and from seed.

Zephyranthes candida was first described by John Lindley in 1823 as Amaryllis candida. It was transferred to its current genus in 1826 by William Herbert. Other common names of Zephyranthes candida include August rain lily, white zephyr lily, white fairy lily, white rain lily, and autumn zephyr lily.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN