dcsimg

Diagnostic Description

provided by Mushroom Observer

Sclerotia are elongated, 1.5-3.5cm long, cylindrical, rounded at the ends, and firm. They are often curved and have slight longitudinal grooves. Usually dark brown to black on the outside and a lighter grayish-white on the inside. One to several sclerotia may be found growing from a single grass inflorescence (Image 1 & Image 2).

When Spring comes, small, mushroom-like stromata emerge from sclerotia that have fallen to the ground. A short stalk elevates a globose head that is approximately 2mm in diameter. Along the head perithecia form. Inside these structures, needle-like sexually formed ascospores develop in elongated asci. Each ascus contains 8 ascospores. The hyaline ascospores are approximately 65-100um x 0.5-1um. The tips of the asci turn blue in Melzer’s reagent. The ascospores are forcibly ejected through a long neck-like ostiole. (Image 3 & Image 4).

The ascospores are wind disseminated and germinate when they land on the flowers of rye (or other susceptible plants in bloom). Germ tubes infect the ovary, destroying tissue and replacing it with mycelium. Short conidiophores bearing tiny oval conidia form. Insects visiting the flower can transfer these asexually produced conidia to uninfected flowers and transfer the fungus.


Image 1: sclerotia on rye



Image 2: sclerotium on rye



Image 3: perithecia



Image 4: perithecium

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
author
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
original
visit source
partner site
Mushroom Observer

Distribution

provided by Mushroom Observer

Temperate regions worldwide, notably in the eastern US and in Europe.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
author
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
original
visit source
partner site
Mushroom Observer

General Description

provided by Mushroom Observer

Claviceps purpurea, commonly known as Ergot, lives most of its life as an ndophyte inside the cells of graminaceous plants, particularly rye. This fungus infects rye through the stigma of its flower and produces a mycelial mat that replaces the plant’s ovarian tissues. This mycelial mat develops into conspicuous brownish-black sclerotia that can be found growing from the inflorescence of the plants. C. purpurea induces hypertrophy and hyperplasia in the plant cells (parasitic behavior), resulting in the relatively large sclerotia. Sclerotia are over-wintering structures that germinate in spring to form small, mushroom-like stromata that produce ascospores in perithecia. These spores are released and infect new plants.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
author
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
original
visit source
partner site
Mushroom Observer

Habitat

provided by Mushroom Observer

Graminaceous plant species, particularly rye. C. purpurea grows best in wet conditions.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
author
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
original
visit source
partner site
Mushroom Observer

Look Alikes

provided by Mushroom Observer

Superficially, some smuts may look similar, but 2 seconds under the microscope will easily distinguish Claviceps with its perithecia, or even just the structure of the sclerotia.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
author
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
original
visit source
partner site
Mushroom Observer

Uses

provided by Mushroom Observer

Besides parasitizing rye, this fungus affects animals as well. The sclerotia produced by Claviceps purpurea contain many powerful alkaloids (ergotamine, ergometrin, ergonovin), some that are useful to people and some that are very harmful to people.

Ergotism:
Cattle are often poisoned by grazing on infected grasses, but people can also be infected. Ergotism is also known as St. Anthony’s Fire. Some of the alkaloids produced by Claviceps purpurea cause vasoconstriction in blood vessels, resulting in a burning sensation, blackening, and eventually the loss of gangrenous limbs. Other symptoms include the feeling of insects crawling under the skin, paralysis, convulsions, vomiting, diarrhea, and abortions. Ingestion also results in hallucinations. Ergotism is thought to be responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people and animals in the last millennium as a result of accidental ingestion of contaminated grain.

It’s been hypothesized that ergot poisoning was responsible for the strange behavior and sickness associated with the Salem Witch Trials in Salem, Massachusetts in the 1600s (see Caporael 1976 for more information).

Childbirth:
The same alkaloid that causes abortions can be administered clinically in low dosages to actually aid in child birth by helping to induce uterine contractions and to prevent post partum hemorrhage.

Headaches:
Another alkaloid produced by this fungus has been successful in treating migraine headaches.

LSD:
The hallucinogenic compound LSD, commonly known as “Acid,” can be synthesized directly from lysergic acid (LSA), which is naturally produced in the ergot sclerotia. LSA has similar psychoactive properties when compared with LSD, which provides a good explanation for the hallucinations associated with Ergotism.

C. purpurea can be easily grown in culture, however, production of sclerotia has not been successful. Regardless, many alkaloid-forming strains have been isolated which produce the desired alkaloids in their mycelium, negating the need for sclerotia. Also, some of the alkaloids can now be produced synthetically.

For additional information see Tom Volk’s fungus of the month page on Claviceps purpurea

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
author
Alan Rockefeller, Tom Volk, matthewfoltz
original
visit source
partner site
Mushroom Observer

Comprehensive Description

provided by North American Flora
Spermoedia clavus (DC.) Fries, Syst. Myc. 2 : 268. 1822
Sclerotium Clavus DC. Fl. Fr. 6 : 115. 1815. Sphaeria purpurea Fries, Syst. Myc. 2 : 325. 1823. Sphacelia Segetum L€v. M^m. Soc. lyinn. Paris 5 : 578. 1827. Claviceps purpurea I^. Tul. Ann. Sci. Nat. III. 20 : 45. 1853.
Sclerotia forming in the young ovaries of various species of grasses, at first soft and viscid, at maturity hard, purplish-black externally, whitish within, 1-2 cm. long; stromata often as many as 20-30 from a single sclerotium ; stem very slender, flexuous or spirally twisted and of a dark-brownish color ; head subglobose with the margin partially free, about 1-2 mm. in diameter, reddish-brown in color and roughened by the slightly protruding necks of the perithecia ; perithecia entirely immersed or very slightly protruding, flask-shaped, 150-175 X 200-250 // ; asci very long, cylindric, 100-125 X 4 /i.
In the inflorescence of rye, and of other wild and cultivated grasses. Type LOCALITY : France. also^n^'Fur™'' '' ^^^ ^"'^ *^ Montana and Utah, and probably throughout North America ;
Nat'pfl'fi;^^/2T>--i" ^"^"'' ™''= ^'' '' ^' ^' ^^^-^^yP^1^11^=/.^-^; B. & P. BxsicCATi: Bllis &'Hy. Fungi Columb. 7<52^, 1816, 2216, 2317; D. Griff. W. Am. Fungi 42.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
Fred Jay Seaver, Helen Letitia Palliser, David Griffiths. 1910. HYPOCREALES, FIMETARIALES. North American flora. vol 3(1). New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY
original
visit source
partner site
North American Flora

Claviceps purpurea

provided by wikipedia EN

Claviceps purpurea is an ergot fungus that grows on the ears of rye and related cereal and forage plants. Consumption of grains or seeds contaminated with the survival structure of this fungus, the ergot sclerotium, can cause ergotism in humans and other mammals.[1][2] C. purpurea most commonly affects outcrossing species such as rye (its most common host), as well as triticale, wheat and barley. It affects oats only rarely.

Life cycle

 src=
Various stages in the life cycle of Claviceps purpurea
 src=
fruiting bodies with head and stipe on Sclerotium

An ergot kernel called Sclerotium clavus develops when a floret of flowering grass or cereal is infected by an ascospore of C. purpurea. The infection process mimics a pollen grain growing into an ovary during fertilization. Because infection requires access of the fungal spore to the stigma, plants infected by C. purpurea are mainly outcrossing species with open flowers, such as rye (Secale cereale) and Alopecurus.

The proliferating fungal mycelium then destroys the plant ovary and connects with the vascular bundle originally intended for feeding the developing seed. The first stage of ergot infection manifests itself as a white soft tissue (known as Sphacelia segetum) producing sugary honeydew, which often drops out of the infected grass florets. This honeydew contains millions of asexual spores (conidia) which are dispersed to other florets by insects or rain. Later, the Sphacelia segetum convert into a hard dry Sclerotium clavus inside the husk of the floret. At this stage, alkaloids and lipids (e.g. ricinoleic acid) accumulate in the Sclerotium.

When a mature Sclerotium drops to the ground, the fungus remains dormant until proper conditions trigger its fruiting phase (onset of spring, rain period, need of fresh temperatures during winter, etc.). It germinates, forming one or several fruiting bodies with head and stipe, variously colored (resembling a tiny mushroom). In the head, threadlike sexual spores (ascospores) are formed in perithecia, which are ejected simultaneously, when suitable grass hosts are flowering. Ergot infection causes a reduction in the yield and quality of grain and hay produced, and if infected grain or hay is fed to livestock it may cause a disease called ergotism.

Polistes dorsalis, a species of social wasps, have been recorded as a vector of the spread of this particular fungus. During their foraging behavior, particles of the fungal conidia get bound to parts of this wasp's body. As P. dorsalis travels from source to source, it leaves the fungal infection behind.[3] Insects, including flies and moths, have also been shown to carry conidia of Claviceps species, but if insects play a role in spreading the fungus from infected to healthy plants is unknown.[4]

Intraspecific variations

 src=
Model of Claviceps purpurea, Botanical Museum Greifswald

Early scientists have observed Claviceps purpurea on other Poaceae as Secale cereale. 1855, Grandclement[5] described ergot on Triticum aestivum. During more than a century scientists aimed to describe specialized species or specialized varieties inside the species Claviceps purpurea.

  • Claviceps microcephala Tul. (1853)
  • Claviceps wilsonii Cooke (1884)

Later scientists tried to determine host varieties as

  • Claviceps purpurea var. agropyri
  • Claviceps purpurea var. purpurea
  • Claviceps purpurea var. spartinae
  • Claviceps purpurea var. wilsonii.

Molecular biology has not confirmed this hypothesis but has distinguished three groups differing in their ecological specificity.[6]

  • G1—land grasses of open meadows and fields;
  • G2—grasses from moist, forest, and mountain habitats;
  • G3 (C. purpurea var. spartinae)—salt marsh grasses (Spartina, Distichlis).

Morphological criteria to distinguish different groups: The shape and the size of sclerotia are not good indicators because they strongly depend on the size and shape of the host floret. The size of conidia can be an indication but it is weak and it is necessary to pay attention to that, due to osmotic pressure, it varies significantly if the spores are observed in honeydew or in water. The sclerotial density can be used as the groups G2 and G3 float in water.

The compound of alkaloids is also used to differentiate the strains.

Host range

 src=
Sclerotium of Claviceps purpurea on Alopecurus myosuroides

Pooideae

Agrostis canina, Alopecurus myosuroides (G2), Alopecurus arundinaceus (G2), Alopecurus pratensis, Bromus arvensis, Bromus commutatus, Bromus hordeaceus (G2), Bromus inermis,[7] Bromus marginatus, Elymus tsukushiense, Festuca arundinacea,[8] Elytrigia repens (G1), Nardus stricta, Poa annua (G2), Phleum pratense, Phalaris arundinacea (G2), Poa pratensis (G1), Stipa.

Arundinoideae

Danthonia, Molinia caerulea.

Chloridoideae

Spartina, Distichlis (G3)

Panicoideae

Setaria

Epidemiology

Claviceps purpurea has been known to mankind for a long time, and its appearance has been linked to extremely cold winters that were followed by rainy springs.

The sclerotial stage of C. purpurea conspicuous on the heads of ryes and other such grains is known as ergot. Sclerotia germinate in spring after a period of low temperature. A temperature of 0-5 °C for at least 25 days is required. Water before the cold period is also necessary.[9] Favorable temperatures for stroma production are in the range of 10-25 °C.[10] Favorable temperatures for mycelial growth are in the range of 20-30 °C with an optimum at 25 °C.[10]

Sunlight has a chromogenic effect on the mycelium with intense coloration.[11]

Effects

 src=
Ergot-derived drug to stop postnatal bleeding

The disease cycle of the ergot fungus was first described in 1853,[12] but the connection with ergot and epidemics among people and animals was reported already in a scientific text in 1676.[13] The ergot sclerotium contains high concentrations (up to 2% of dry mass) of the alkaloid ergotamine, a complex molecule consisting of a tripeptide-derived cyclol-lactam ring connected via amide linkage to a lysergic acid (ergoline) moiety, and other alkaloids of the ergoline group that are biosynthesized by the fungus.[14] Ergot alkaloids have a wide range of biological activities including effects on circulation and neurotransmission.[15]

Ergotism is the name for sometimes severe pathological syndromes affecting humans or animals that have ingested ergot alkaloid-containing plant material, such as ergot-contaminated grains. Monks of the order of St. Anthony the Great specialized in treating ergotism victims[16] with balms containing tranquilizing and circulation-stimulating plant extracts; they were also skilled in amputations. The common name for ergotism is "St. Anthony's Fire",[16] in reference to monks who cared for victims as well as symptoms, such as severe burning sensations in the limbs.[17] These are caused by effects of ergot alkaloids on the vascular system due to vasoconstriction of blood vessels, sometimes leading to gangrene and loss of limbs due to severely restricted blood circulation.

The neurotropic activities of the ergot alkaloids may also cause hallucinations and attendant irrational behaviour, convulsions, and even death.[14][15] Other symptoms include strong uterine contractions, nausea, seizures, and unconsciousness. Since the Middle Ages, controlled doses of ergot were used to induce abortions and to stop maternal bleeding after childbirth.[18] Ergot alkaloids are also used in products such as Cafergot (containing caffeine and ergotamine[18] or ergoline) to treat migraine headaches. Ergot extract is no longer used as a pharmaceutical preparation.

Ergot contains no lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) but rather ergotamine, which is used to synthesize lysergic acid, an analog of and precursor for synthesis of LSD. Moreover, ergot sclerotia naturally contain some amounts of lysergic acid.[19]

Culture

 src=
Sphacelia segetum on potato dextrose agar

Potato dextrose agar, wheat seeds or oat flour are suitable substrates for growth of the fungus in the laboratory.[20]

Agricultural production of Claviceps purpurea on rye is used to produce ergot alkaloids. Biological production of ergot alkaloids is also carried out by saprophytic cultivations.

Speculations

During the Middle Ages, human poisoning due to the consumption of rye bread made from ergot-infected grain was common in Europe. These epidemics were known as Saint Anthony's fire,[16] or ignis sacer.

Gordon Wasson proposed that the psychedelic effects were the explanation behind the festival of Demeter at the Eleusinian Mysteries, where the initiates drank kykeon.[21]

Linnda R. Caporael posited in 1976 that the hysterical symptoms of young women that had spurred the Salem witch trials had been the result of consuming ergot-tainted rye.[22] However, her conclusions were later disputed by Nicholas P. Spanos and Jack Gottlieb, after a review of the historical and medical evidence.[23] Other authors have likewise cast doubt on ergotism having been the cause of the Salem witch trials.[24]

The Great Fear in France during the Revolution has also been linked by some historians to the influence of ergot.

British author John Grigsby claims that the presence of ergot in the stomachs of some of the so-called 'bog-bodies' (Iron Age human remains from peat bogs N E Europe such as Tollund Man), reveals that ergot was once a ritual drink in a prehistoric fertility cult akin to the Eleusinian Mysteries cult of ancient Greece. In his book Beowulf and Grendel he argues that the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf is based on a memory of the quelling of this fertility cult by followers of Odin. He states that Beowulf, which he translates as barley-wolf, suggests a connection to ergot which in German was known as the 'tooth of the wolf'.

An outbreak of violent hallucinations among hundreds of residents of Pont St. Esprit in 1951 in the south of France has also been attributed to ergotism.[25] Seven people died.

See also

References

  1. ^ "ergot definition". mondofacto. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03.
  2. ^ "ergot". Dorland's Medical Dictionary. Archived from the original on September 10, 2009. Retrieved August 9, 2017 – via Merck Source.
  3. ^ Hardy, Tad N. (September 1988). "Gathering of Fungal Honeydew by Polistes spp. (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) and Potential Transmission of the Causal Ergot Fungus". The Florida Entomologist. 71 (3): 374–376. doi:10.2307/3495447. JSTOR 3495447.
  4. ^ Butler, M.D.; Alderman, S. C.; Hammond, P.C.; Berry, R. E. (2001). "Association of Insects and Ergot (Claviceps purpurea) in Kentucky Bluegrass Seed Production Fields". J. Econ. Entomol. 94 (6): 1471–1476. doi:10.1603/0022-0493-94.6.1471. PMID 11777051. S2CID 8725020.
  5. ^ Mr Gonod d'Artemare (1860). "Note sur l'ergot du froment". Bulletin de la Société botanique de France: 771.
  6. ^ Pažoutová S.; Olšovská J.; Linka M.; Kolínská R.; Flieger M. (2000). "Chemoraces and habitat specialization of Claviceps purpurea populations". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 66 (12): 5419–5425. Bibcode:2000ApEnM..66.5419P. doi:10.1128/aem.66.12.5419-5425.2000. PMC 92477. PMID 11097923.
  7. ^ Eken C.; Pažoutová S.; Honzátko A.; Yildiz S. (2006). "First report of Alopecurus arundinaceus, A. myosuroides, Hordeum violaceum and Phleum pratense as hosts of Claviceps purpurea population G2 in Turkey". J. Plant Pathol. 88: 121.
  8. ^ Douhan G. W.; Smith M. E.; Huyrn, K. L.; Yildiz S. (2008). "Multigene analysis suggests ecological speciation in the fungal pathogen Claviceps purpurea". Molecular Ecology. 17 (9): 2276–2286. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.03753.x. PMC 2443689. PMID 18373531.
  9. ^ Kichhoff H (1929). "Beiträge zur Biologie und Physiologie des Mutterkornpilzes". Centralblat. Bakteriol. Parasitenk. Abt. II. 77: 310–369.
  10. ^ a b Mitchell D.T. (1968). "Some effects of temperature on germination of sclerotia in Claviceps purpurea". Trans. Br. Mycol. Soc. 51 (5): 721–729. doi:10.1016/s0007-1536(68)80092-0.
  11. ^ McCrea A (1931). "The reactions of Claviceps purpurea to variations of environment" (PDF). Am. J. Bot. 18 (1): 50–78. doi:10.2307/2435724. hdl:2027.42/141053. JSTOR 2435724.
  12. ^ Tulasne, L.-R. (1853) Mémoire sur l'ergot des glumacéses Ann. Sci. Nat. (Parie Botanique), 20 5-56
  13. ^ Dodart D. (1676) Le journal des savans, T. IV, p. 79
  14. ^ a b Tudzynski P, Correia T, Keller U (2001). "Biotechnology and genetics of ergot alkaloids". Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 57 (5–6): 4593–4605. doi:10.1007/s002530100801. PMID 11778866. S2CID 847027.
  15. ^ a b Eadie MJ (2003). "Convulsive ergotism: epidemics of the serotonin syndrome?". Lancet Neurol. 2 (7): 429–434. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(03)00439-3. PMID 12849122. S2CID 12158282.
  16. ^ a b c J. Heritage; Emlyn Glyn Vaughn Evans; R. A. Killington (1999). Microbiology in Action. Cambridge University Press. p. 115.
  17. ^ St. Anthony's Fire -- Ergotism
  18. ^ a b Untersuchungen über das Verhalten der Secalealkaloide bei der Herstellung von Mutterkornextrakten. Labib Farid Nuar. Universität Wien - 1946 - (University of Vienna)
  19. ^ Correia T, Grammel N, Ortel I, Keller U, Tudzynski P (2001). "Molecular cloning and analysis of the ergopeptine assembly system in the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea". Chem. Biol. 10 (12): 1281–1292. doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2003.11.013. PMID 14700635.
  20. ^ Mirdita, Vilson (2006). Genetische Variation für Resistenz gegen Mutterkorn (Claviceps purpurea [Fr.] Tul.) bei selbstinkompatiblen und selbstfertilen Roggenpopulationen (Thesis). Archived from the original on 2009-09-09. Retrieved 2009-04-25.
  21. ^ Gordon Wasson, The Road To Eleusis: Unveiling The Secret of The Mysteries (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1977) ISBN 0151778728
  22. ^ Caporael LR (April 1976). "Ergotism: the satan loosed in Salem?". Science. 192 (4234): 21–6. Bibcode:1976Sci...192...21C. doi:10.1126/science.769159. PMID 769159. Archived from the original on 2008-05-11. Retrieved 2009-04-25.
  23. ^ Spanos NP, Gottlieb J (December 1976). "Ergotism and the Salem Village witch trials". Science. 194 (4272): 1390–4. Bibcode:1976Sci...194.1390S. doi:10.1126/science.795029. PMID 795029.
  24. ^ Woolf A (2000). "Witchcraft or mycotoxin? The Salem witch trials". J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 38 (4): 457–460. doi:10.1081/CLT-100100958. PMID 10930065. S2CID 10469595.
  25. ^ Gabbai, J.; Lisbonne, L. & Pourquier, F. (September 1951). "Ergot poisoning at Pont St. Esprit". Br Med J. 15 (4732): 2276–2286. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.4732.650. PMC 2069953. PMID 14869677.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Claviceps purpurea: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Claviceps purpurea is an ergot fungus that grows on the ears of rye and related cereal and forage plants. Consumption of grains or seeds contaminated with the survival structure of this fungus, the ergot sclerotium, can cause ergotism in humans and other mammals. C. purpurea most commonly affects outcrossing species such as rye (its most common host), as well as triticale, wheat and barley. It affects oats only rarely.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Ergot du seigle

provided by wikipedia FR

Claviceps purpurea

L'ergot du seigle (Claviceps purpurea Tul.) est un champignon du groupe des ascomycètes, parasite du seigle (et d'autres céréales). Il contient des alcaloïdes responsables de l'ergotisme, en particulier l’acide lysergique dont est dérivé le LSD.

Description

 src=
Stromas germant sur une sclérote.

C'est un mycélium permanent capable d'hiémation.

Claviceps purpurea prend successivement trois formes : le sclérote (Sclerotium clavus), masse mycélienne noire violacée cassante, blanchâtre à l'intérieur, remplace le grain, puis tombe sur le sol où il se conserve l'hiver.

Au début du printemps, le sclérote germe, produisant plusieurs sphères qui sont des stromas pédicellées renfermant des périthèces : on parle de forme téléomorphe. Claviceps purpurea est homothallique, mais le sclérote peut être formé de mycélium issu de plusieurs spores et, dans ce cas, la reproduction sexuée peut se réaliser avec l’interaction de deux thalles différents. Les asques renferment huit ascospores filiformes qui vont contaminer les stigmates d'un hôte (Poacée), puis l'ovaire, où le mycélium forme un capuchon blanc : c'est la forme conidienne (Sphacelia segetum). Les conidies produites dans un miellat sont disséminées par les insectes ou par le vent. Lorsque la production de conidies cesse, la forme sphacélienne évolue en sclérote.

Plantes hôtes

L'ergot peut parasiter toutes les espèces de la sous-famille des Pooidées, ainsi que certaines espèces des sous-familles des Chloridoidées et des Arundinoidées. Parmi les céréales, seuls le maïs et le sorgho ne sont pas concernés. Aucune variété liée à une spécialisation de l'hôte n'a été mise en évidence, en revanche, on peut distinguer génétiquement trois groupes qui présentent des caractéristiques écologiques différentes : G1 que l'on rencontre plutôt dans les prairies, les champs et autres zones ouvertes, G2 plus adapté aux zones humides, ombragées et G3 spécialisé aux marécages salés. Alopecurus myosuroides et A. pratensis semblent pouvoir jouer un rôle important lors de la contamination des cultures de céréales[1].

Moyens de lutte

La source d’infection de la culture provient généralement des graminées « hôtes » des bordures de champs. Les variétés qui tallent et fleurissent de façon inégale ou qui ont un haut degré de stérilité sont souvent plus affectées par l’ergot.

Il faut diminuer l'inoculum. Pour cela, il faut utiliser des semences indemnes de sclérotes ou de fragments de sclérotes.

Certains traitements de semences ont montré aussi leur efficacité pour empêcher la germination des sclérotes (exemple : Fluquinconazole, azoxystrobine et prochloraze sous réserve d'autorisation).

Les techniques culturales permettent de limiter l'inoculum : le désherbage antigraminée limite les plantes relais. On peut également limiter les plantes relais en fauchant les abords du champ avant la floraison. Le labour permet de détruire les sclérotes en les enfouissant. Il est possible d'utiliser des variétés résistantes ou de protéger la floraison par un fongicide (exemple : tébuconazol sous réserve d'autorisation).

La sévérité de l’ergot chez le seigle d’hiver diminue lorsqu’on augmente la densité de semis.

Composition

Il contient des alcaloïdes polycycliques du groupe des indoles. Ces alcaloïdes dont la biosynthèse se fait à partir du tryptophane dérivent soit de l'acide lysergique (l'ergométrine, l'ergotamine, l'ergocristine, l'ergocornine, alpha-ergokryptine, l'ergosine), soit de l'acide isolysolergique (ergocristinine, ergometrinine ... isomère sans rôle biologique important) soit, dans une moindre mesure, du diméthyl ergoline (clavines). Ce sont ces alcaloïdes qui sont responsables des toxicités en alimentation humaine et animale et leur quantité n'est pas directement proportionnelle à la quantité d'ergot. Cependant, comme on ne connait que mal le rôle de chacun, lorsqu'il existe des réglementations, elles portent sur la proportion d'ergot en poids dans le grain. Le LSD est un dérivé synthétique de l'acide lysergique.

Biosynthèse des alcaloïdes

Les gènes permettant la synthèse des alcaloïdes sont regroupés dans un cluster de gènes. La première étape de la biosynthèse est une prénylation du tryptophane qui réagit avec le diméthylallylpyrophosphate. Le produit obtenu est le diméthylallyltryptophane. L'enzyme clé est la DMAT synthase codée par le gène DMAw. D'autres étapes intermédiaires produisent ensuite des clavines (chanoclavine, agroclavine, élymoclavine). Une enzyme, la cytochrome P450 monooxygénase codée par le gène CloA, catalyse la conversion de l’élymoclavine en acide paspalique précurseur de l'acide lysergique. La catalyse non ribosomique des tripeptides est due à des enzymes possédant trois sites : le gène lpsA1 code l'enzyme permettant la synthèse du tripeptide alanine, phénylalanine et proline caractéristique de l’ergotamine et le gène lpsA2 code l'enzyme permettant la synthèse du tripeptide valine, isoleucine et proline caractéristique de l’ergocryptine (en). Le gène lpsC code une enzyme à un seul site permettant la synthèse de l’ergométrine[2].

Règlementation européenne

La teneur en ergot des lots de céréales est réglementée en Europe. En alimentation humaine, les céréales concernées par l'intervention (blé tendre et blé dur) doivent avoir une teneur en ergot inférieure à 0,05 %[3] ; cette teneur devrait être retenue à partir de 2015 pour tous les échanges de lot de céréales en Europe par modification du règlement 1881/2006[4]. En alimentation animale, les céréales et aliments contenant des céréales non moulues doivent avoir une teneur en ergot inférieure à 1 000 mg par kilogramme (directive européenne 2002/32 transcrite par l’arrêté français du 10 janvier 1981 modifié)[5]. En 2013, le Comité européen des médicaments à usage humain (CMUH), de l'Agence européenne des médicaments (EMA) recommande de limiter les indications autorisées pour les spécialités contenant des dérivés de l'ergot de seigle. En 2011, c'est l'Agence nationale française de sécurité sanitaire des médicaments et produits de santé (ANSM) qui avait repéré des problèmes. Toutefois, les spécialités contenant des dérivés de l'ergot sont conservées dans les indications suivantes : le traitement des démences (dont la maladie d'Alzheimer) et le traitement de la crise de migraine aiguë[6].

Utilisation

Son usage par les sages-femmes pour accélérer la délivrance semble ancestral même s'il n'est mentionné dans un recueil de plantes médicinales qu'en 1582 par le docteur allemand Adam Lonitzer[7].

À partir du milieu du XIXe siècle, son usage ancestral attire l'attention et les recherches visant à isoler les principes actifs commencent[7]. En 1907, les britanniques G. Barger et F. H. Carr isolent une préparation active d'alcaloïdes qu'ils nomment ergotoxine[8]. Mais c'est le pharmacologue H. H. Dale qui met en évidence les caractéristiques utéro-constrictives et inhibitrices sur l'adrénaline de la préparation. En 1908, un médecin américain (John Stearn) consacre une publication (Account of the pulvis parturiens, a remedy for quickening childbirth) à l'ergot qui le met en avant dans la médecine traditionnelle. Mais son usage est jugé trop dangereux pour l'enfant puisqu'en cas d'erreur de dosage la parturiente souffre de spasmes utérins ; son utilisation se limite ensuite à la réduction des hémorragies postnatales.

Ce n'est qu'en 1918 qu'Arthur Stoll isole enfin un alcaloïde, l'ergotamine ce qui ouvre la voie à l'usage thérapeutique.

Finalement dans les années 1930, les Américains W. A. Jacob et L. C. Craig isolent l'élément fondamental commun à tous les alcaloïdes de l'ergot, l'acide lysergique. Enfin, Arthur Stoll et E. Burckhardt isolent le principe antihémorragique de l'ergot, l'ergométrine (aussi appelée ergobasine ou ergonovine).

Albert Hofmann est le premier à la synthétiser et à en améliorer les capacités thérapeutiques utéro-constrictives en élaborant un dérivé la méthylergométrine qui est commercialisée sous le nom Methergine ; c'est en cherchant d'autres molécules actives selon la même méthode qu'il synthétise le LSD en 1938.

En médecine, les dérivés de l'ergot de seigle sont des molécules utilisées en particulier dans le traitement des crises de migraine.

Aspect culturels et historiques

 src=
Il est possible que l'ergot ait été personnifié par un des esprits des champs (de) du folklore allemand, le loup du seigle (de)[9].

Il fut autrefois responsable d'une maladie, l'ergotisme, appelée au Moyen Âge mal des ardents ou feu de saint Antoine, liée à la présence d'ergot dans le seigle utilisé pour fabriquer le pain. Cette maladie, qui dure jusqu'au XVIIe siècle, se présente sous forme d'hallucinations passagères, similaires à ce que provoque le LSD, et à une vasoconstriction artériolaire, suivie de la perte de sensibilité des extrémités des différents membres, comme les bouts des doigts. À cette époque, il était communément admis[réf. nécessaire] que ces personnes étaient des victimes de sorcellerie ou de démons. Saint Antoine est le saint patron des ergotiques[10].

Épidémies médiévales

Une mycotoxine peut être produite par l'ascomycète Claviceps purpurea et pourrait aussi avoir été responsable en 994 d'une épidémie induite par la consommation de pain ayant tué environ 40 000 personnes[11].

La « Grande Peur » de 1789

Selon Mary Matossian, l'ergot de seigle aurait fait partie des causes de la Grande Peur de 1789[12].

Pont-Saint-Esprit, 1951

Pendant l'été 1951, une série d'intoxications alimentaires frappe la France, dont la plus sérieuse à partir du 17 août à Pont-Saint-Esprit, où elle fait sept morts, 50 internés dans des hôpitaux psychiatriques et 250 personnes affligées de symptômes plus ou moins graves ou durables. Le corps médical pense alors que le pain maudit aurait pu contenir de l'ergot de seigle, mais sans en avoir la preuve. Le pain acheté dans la boulangerie Briand provoque vomissements, maux de têtes, douleurs gastriques, musculaires, et accès de folie (convulsions démoniaques, hallucinations et tentatives de suicide), troubles pouvant évoquer l'ergotisme. La ville est prise de panique ; un journal, cité par l'historien Steven Kaplan, observe :

« Alors, faute du nom du mal, on veut connaître celui de l'homme responsable. Les versions les plus abracadabrantes circulent. On accuse le boulanger (ancien candidat RPF, protégé d'un conseiller général gaulliste), son mitron, puis l'eau des fontaines, puis les modernes machines à battre, les puissances étrangères, la guerre bactériologique, le diable, la SNCF, le pape, Staline, l'Église, les nationalisations. »

Les Spiripontains applaudissent l'arrestation d'un meunier poitevin, fournisseur de la farine employée à Pont-Saint-Esprit, incarcéré à Nîmes, avant de s'élever contre sa libération[13]. Depuis, d'autres hypothèses ont été formulées, qui pourraient innocenter l'ergot du seigle.

Notes et références

  1. (en) P. G. Mantle & S. Shaw, « A Case Study of Aetiology of Ergot Disease of Cereals and Grasses », Pl. Path., vol. 26,‎ 1977, p. 121-126
  2. Nicole Lorenz, Thomas Haarmann, Sylvie Pažoutová, Manfred Jung et Paul Tudzynski The ergot alkaloid gene cluster: Functional analyses and evolutionary aspects 2009
  3. [PDF] « Règlement (CE) No 687/2008 de la commission du 18 juillet 2008 fixant les procédures de prise en charge des céréales par les organismes payeurs ou les organismes d’intervention ainsi que les méthodes d’analyse pour la détermination de la qualité » (consulté le 18 septembre 2013)
  4. Céline Fricotté, « L'Europe règlemente l'ergot », La France Agricole,‎ 24 avril 2015
  5. [PDF] « Directive 2002/32/CE du parlement européen et du conseil du 7 mai 2002 sur les substances indésirables dans les aliments pour animaux »
  6. « Médicaments : les dangers des dérivés de l'ergot de seigle », 1er juillet 2013
  7. a et b Albert Hofmann (trad. de l'allemand), LSD mon enfant terrible, Paris, Esprit frappeur, 1979 (réimpr. 1989, 1997, 2003), 243 p. (ISBN 2-84405-196-0), p. 243.
  8. Albert Hofmann démontrera par la suite qu'elle se compose de trois alcaloïdes : l'ergocristine, l'ergocornine, l'ergokryptine.
  9. (en) John Grigsby, Beowulf & Grendel: The Truth Behind England's Oldest Myth, Watkins, 2005, p. 188
  10. Barbara Ehrenreich et Deirdre English, Sorcières, sages-femmes et infirmières : Une histoire des femmes soignantes, Paris, Cambourakis, 17 février 2016, 120 p. (ISBN 9782366241228), page 51.
  11. Page 41 et Chapitre V du livre « Mycologie médicale » de Dominique Chabasse, Claude Guiguen, Nelly Contet-Audonneau, Ed : Elsevier Masson, 1999, (ISBN 2225829128), 9782225829123, 324 pages
  12. (en) Matossian, Mary Kilbourne, Poisons of the Past: Molds, Epidemics, and History. New Haven: Yale, 1989 Réédition août 1991, (ISBN 0-300-05121-2)
  13. Steven L. Kaplan, « Le pain maudit de Pont-Saint-Esprit », p. 68 de L'Histoire no 271, décembre 2002, article intitulé « Le pain, le peuple et le roi », p. 64-70.

Voir aussi

Littérature
  • L'ergot de seigle, roman de Guy-Marie Vianney 1978 : ici l'ergot est un symbole, c'est la haine qui pousse au cœur de l'homme.
  • Le Rituel de l'ombre, roman policier d'Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne : l'ergot est associé à deux autres substances pour former une drogue censée mettre directement en communication avec les dieux.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Ergot du seigle: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Claviceps purpurea

L'ergot du seigle (Claviceps purpurea Tul.) est un champignon du groupe des ascomycètes, parasite du seigle (et d'autres céréales). Il contient des alcaloïdes responsables de l'ergotisme, en particulier l’acide lysergique dont est dérivé le LSD.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR